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Author Topic: Recipe for small batch 8 inch pizzas  (Read 755 times)

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Offline PizzAmateur

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Recipe for small batch 8 inch pizzas
« on: March 14, 2019, 12:16:38 AM »
What I am looking for is a recipe for a very small batch of dough for American/Papa John's style pizza.

My usual pizza is 8 to 9 inches and sometimes 10.  That's just about all I can eat at one time.  I don't like cold pizza and don't like to reheat slices.  So, I make small, "personal sized", pizzas.

My usual dough ball is anywhere from 100 to 120 grams, so the middle is relatively thin, but I like a big puffy cornice.

I am no good with the tools available here, so I am hopeful that someone could "scale" a recipe down for me.

I used to make enough dough for 6 to 8 balls, but now I think 3 or 4 balls is about all I can use in a reasonable time frame.

Suggestions for CF or RTF are both welcome.

As my handle suggests, I am an amateur pizza maker.  My home oven (old, OLD, Harvest Gold color home oven, so late 1960's - early 1980's) *can* reach 550F, but I usually start cooking as soon as it is preheated.

I do use a stone, which is now in the cleaning cycle because I let my dough rest too long after shaping and topping and, although it was sliding just seconds before launch... it stuck and tore a large hole right in the middle as I launched it onto the stone leaving sauce, cheese and topping to stick to it.  (heavy sigh...)

And THAT would not have bothered me so much, but I had JUST finished a cleaning cycle and the stone was immaculate! (Heavier sigh)

The pizza actually turned out OK, except for the big hole... (smile)

Sorry there are no pictures...  I don't own a good digital camera and my cellphone camera sucks. 

Also, my home was recently burglarized and they took just about everything.  I am only starting to feel "normal" again in the last few days, yet I haven't left the house in the weeks since the burglary.  It isn't the stuff they stole, so much as the feeling of being violated and not feeling safe enough to leave what little I have left.  Working on security system, etc, but that all takes money, of which I am in short supply.

I am using a variation of the Papa John's clone recipe found on this site.  I don't have scales, so I am more used to going by the "feel" the dough.  Yeah, I know... getting a scale soon! (grin)

Thanks in advance!
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 01:24:59 AM by PizzAmateur »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Recipe for small batch 8 inch pizzas
« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2019, 10:17:37 AM »
PizzAmateur,

I think I should be able to help. Can you tell me how many dough balls you want to make and what pizza size you want? Also, can you tell me what type and brand of flour and what type and brand of yeast you plan to use, and what type(s) of measuring cups you have available to you to measure out flour and water?

You might also want to scan the first few pages of the Papa John's clone thread at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58195#msg58195 to see if a particular version of the many versions I made strikes your fancy. Some are harder to make than others, especially the basic one that can that sustain up to eight days of cold fermentation. That is more difficult to do in a standard home refrigerator with all of the door openings.

I'm sorry to hear about the problems you have been experiencing as a result of the recent burglary.

Peter

Offline PizzAmateur

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Re: Recipe for small batch 8 inch pizzas
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2019, 07:02:57 PM »
PizzaAmateur,

I think I should be able to help. Can you tell me how many dough balls you want to make and what pizza size you want? Also, can you tell me what type and brand of flour and what type and brand of yeast you plan to use, and what type(s) of measuring cups you have available to you to measure out flour and water?

You might also want to scan the first few pages of the Papa John's clone thread at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg58195#msg58195 to see if a particular version of the many versions I made strikes your fancy. Some are harder to make than others, especially the basic one that can that sustain up to eight days of cold fermentation. That is more difficult to do in a standard home refrigerator with all of the door openings.

I'm sorry to hear about the problems you have been experiencing as a result of the recent burglary.

Peter

Thank you Pete!

I use whatever bread flour is on sale, so it could either be White Lilly, Pilsbury, Gold Medal, or even a store brand.  I think the protein levels vary from about 11% up to -13%.

I was making a pizza a day, but have cut back, so about half that. 3-5 balls per week is probably closer to what I do now.

Since I am only making pizza for myself, and I can't eat as much as I used to, my pies are 8 to 10 inches.  Ranging more towards the 8 inch size.

I have NO measuring spoons.  However, I did just get a digital scale from a friend which does measure as small as grams.

My refrigerator is COLD.  Although I don't have a thermometer for it, I am guessing that it is less than 39 F.  I like it cold.

From what I can understand, I am using a "version" of the Papa John's clone recipes you listed.  I used to only use sugar to increase browning, but increased the sugar based on those recipes.

I have done cold fermentation for as many as 8 days, but have found that about 5 days is as long as the dough usually remains stable without collapsing when I proof it at RT.  Or something like that...

Thanks for the reply, given that I wrote it while coming down with the flu (103F fever) and being heavily influenced by too much Bourbon.  (smile)

Thanks again for your reply and help!

p.s.

Oops... the yeast I use is Fleishman's ADY which I buy in vacuum sealed one pound bags.  I have never had a problem with activation even though it can take me a few years to use up a 2 pound purchase.  I keep it in the refrigerator.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2019, 07:09:17 PM by PizzAmateur »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Recipe for small batch 8 inch pizzas
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2019, 10:39:39 AM »
PizzAmateur,

After considering your comments, I think that a good start would be to make three dough balls and use them to make 8" pizzas. I also think that a three-day cold fermentation window is a good place to start. Then, based on how the pizzas turn out, we can modify the dough formulation if you decide you want to proceed further. As for the flour, I think I would go with the General Mills or Pillsbury bread flour. I would not go with the White Lily flour because of its lower protein content. Ideally, we would want to go with a flour that has a higher protein content than the GM or Pillsbury bread flours but I think either of those flours should produce a pretty good pizza.

As the basic dough formulation to modify to come up with a version you can test out, I am thinking of the dough formulation as set forth in Reply 585 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6758.msg273667.html#msg273667 but using ADY instead of IDY and making a few other adjustments, such as reducing the hydration value by one percent to better conform to the flour you will be using. In using ADY, you will want to prehydrate it in a small amount of the formula water at a temperature of about 105 degrees F for about ten minutes. It can then be combined with the rest of the formula water. The rest of the formula water should be at a temperature to achieve a finished dough temperature of about 70-75 degrees F for a home setting. For the amount of ADY to use, I am using Craig's yeast chart at Reply 188 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26831.msg349349#msg349349 (you can enlarge the chart by clicking on it)

I will also be assuming a refrigerator temperature of 37 degrees F. On that basis, the amount of ADY from Craig's chart is about 0.29%. Refrigerator temperatures can vary somewhat so it may be necessary to adjust the amount of yeast based on your results. One of the benefits of making three dough balls is that you might make the pizzas at different stages. For example, the first pizza might be made after 3 days, the second pizza after 4 days, and the last pizza after 5 days. It may well be that the dough may not make it out to five days but the only way to know for sure is to test the thesis. I propose to use a thickness factor that is closer to what is said (by a former PJ employee) to be used by PJ to make 10" pizzas. That value is 0.1337. I will also use a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%. That may yield a dough ball weight a bit greater than desired (6.72 ounces) so you will want to measure out a weight of 6.72 ounces (190.53 grams) for each dough ball..

Based on the above, and using the expanded dough calculating tool at https://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded-calculator.html, here is a proposed PJ clone formulation for you to use for test purposes to make 8" pizzas.

Bread Flour (100%):
Water (55%):
ADY (0.29%):
Salt (1.9%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (5.55%):
Sugar (5.89%):
Total (168.63%):
Single Ball:
344.04 g  |  12.14 oz | 0.76 lbs
189.22 g  |  6.67 oz | 0.42 lbs
1 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.26 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
6.54 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.17 tsp | 0.39 tbsp
19.09 g | 0.67 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.2 tsp | 1.4 tbsp
20.26 g | 0.71 oz | 0.04 lbs | 5.08 tsp | 1.69 tbsp
580.15 g | 20.46 oz | 1.28 lbs | TF = 0.1357055
193.38 g | 6.82 oz | 0.43 lbs
Note: Each dough ball (6.72 ounces) is to make an 8" pizza; nominal thickness factor (the value used in the above tool) is 0.1337; bowl residue compensation = 1.5%

If you have any questions before proceeding further, let me know. Otherwise, good luck and please let us know how things work out.

Peter

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