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Author Topic: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza  (Read 464 times)

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Offline hammettjr

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Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« on: April 09, 2019, 09:21:38 PM »
Hi Tom,
I'm trying to replicate New England Greek pan pizza, which often has a light somewhat biscuity crust, without being dry or crumbly

My research has led me to try 3% egg, 6% oil, low 50s water, 1.75 salt, 1.9 sugar and high gluten flour. But the result has been basically my usual NY-ish crust, nothing special.

Any thoughts on what can help me get closer to the crust pictured below?

Many thanks
Matt
Matt

Offline foreplease

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2019, 09:54:46 PM »
Who are you and what have you done with Matt??  :-D
-Tony

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2019, 10:19:12 PM »
Begin by moving away from the high protein flour and move more towards a lower protein bread type flour with around 10 to 11% protein content. Don't use oil, instead use shortening at 8%. Whole egg only contributes to a dry, firm crumb structure, instead, if you have to use an egg product, use only egg yolk at 5%. Remember to mix the dough JUST until it's well incorporated...5 to 6-minutes, don't over mix it. Also remember to proof it after forming, 30 to 45-minutes should be sufficient.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline hammettjr

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2019, 12:12:38 PM »
Begin by moving away from the high protein flour and move more towards a lower protein bread type flour with around 10 to 11% protein content. Don't use oil, instead use shortening at 8%. Whole egg only contributes to a dry, firm crumb structure, instead, if you have to use an egg product, use only egg yolk at 5%. Remember to mix the dough JUST until it's well incorporated...5 to 6-minutes, don't over mix it. Also remember to proof it after forming, 30 to 45-minutes should be sufficient.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Thanks Tom, sounds like there's alot to change! I'll start with the flour as I'd like to understand that impact on its own. I'm currently using All Trumps at 14.2%. I have King Aurthur All Purpose,  which at 11.7% doesnt get into the 10-11% range, but may be an ok starting point?

Tony, dont worry, my NY pies arent going anywhere, but I like to make these pan pizzas from time to time. (Without any toppings of course!) My latest is linked below.

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=691.msg564929#msg564929



Matt

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #4 on: April 10, 2019, 10:15:02 PM »
Your 11.7% protein content flour should work well for a starting point.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline Jackitup

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2019, 03:04:35 AM »
If you look back in the advanced search for biscuit and or rice flour crusts, there was a spurt of interest in biscuit doughs using a percentage of rice flour. I did a few and liked them! One was almost like a crispy cookie!
Jon

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If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline scott r

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2019, 06:18:19 AM »
Im not sure if your trying to replicate a pizza like what we have in and around Boston, but up here many of the greek pizzerias use milk and a high percentage of oil in the dough.  I wouldn't exactly call it a biscuit type dough, but it is really soft and it looks like what you have in your picture.  That also looks like the white cheddar most of these types of pizzerias are using.  Sugar and oregano in the sauce are also used most of the time for that style. 
« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 06:23:39 AM by scott r »

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2019, 01:37:46 PM »
Pretty sure this is the thread I was referring to! BTB started it, great contributor here!!! Good read!! He uses semolina and rice flour in the mix

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8291.msg71517#msg71517
« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 01:39:39 PM by Jackitup »
Jon

“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline Francois.du.nord

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #8 on: April 14, 2019, 02:00:28 PM »
I'm no expert on anything east of Chi-Town, but from your description of 'Biscuit like' I immediately think Chicago Thin or Deep Dish. Have you looked at those recipes? Enriched dough with oil/shortening and a % of semolina.

Best, Fran

Offline hammettjr

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #9 on: April 14, 2019, 08:17:34 PM »
Using AP flour led to a nice improvement, thank you! Will come back again with more. Here is the pie:
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=691.msg573630#msg573630

Matt

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Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2019, 11:33:09 PM »
I'm no expert on anything east of Chi-Town, but from your description of 'Biscuit like' I immediately think Chicago Thin or Deep Dish. Have you looked at those recipes? Enriched dough with oil/shortening and a % of semolina.

Best, Fran

As a semi-French speaking person... I would like to ask if you're related to Francois du sud?? ;) j/k obviously...  ;D

Offline enchant

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2019, 05:15:49 PM »
Matt, once you mixed it, how long (and where) did you proof your dough?
--pat--

Offline hammettjr

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2019, 05:38:34 PM »
Matt, once you mixed it, how long (and where) did you proof your dough?

Pat,
10 minutes at room temp then about 44 hours in my fridge (around 36 degrees). I took it out for about a half hour then stretched it fully into the pan. It sat in the pan at room temp for around an hour and a half.
Matt

Offline enchant

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Re: Achieving biscuit-like pan pizza
« Reply #13 on: April 15, 2019, 06:43:43 PM »
Once a year or so, I try to make these pizzas and I always fail badly.  Enough time has gone by that I've forgotten my failures and I think I'm ready to take another stab at it.
--pat--

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