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Author Topic: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza  (Read 675 times)

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Offline Rudeness

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Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« on: April 10, 2019, 11:45:15 PM »
First go at making pizza dough by hand the formula is something like

100flour/65water/.5yeast/2salt/1.5oil/2sugar

Mixed and kneaded dough by hand

I live in studio apartment and will be making pizza in small oven with a pizza pan from Target

Sauce is local italian pizza sauce from chicago suburbs "dealpo" or something and I will probably water it down. Cheese is a block of part skim mozz FROM DA JEWL-plan to chop it up when it's time to go.


I mixed dough tonight and let it rise in bowl for 2 hours then divided it into 4 balls to cold ferment for 48hrs - Pizza party ((table for one please!))is Friday

Below are some pictures of dough when it was first mixed and then after first rise and divided into doughballz

WISH ME LUCK FELLAS (and Norma) !!!



« Last Edit: April 11, 2019, 09:19:35 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Rudeness

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2019, 02:43:12 AM »
the results are in - next time I need to increase thickness factor and weight of dough balls-had to stretch dough very thin but still turned out great!

cheese
pepperoni pineapple
white pizza
pepperoni and mushroom

Also want to make 18" not 14" pies next time!!

Not bad for first try - I don't think I have to worry about ordering pizza anymore!

Offline PizzAmateur

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2019, 03:23:28 AM »
My own creations may not be so good, but I haven't bought pizza in about 3 years.

Even my failures (and there have been/are many) teach me something and cost much

less (about 90% less) than anything I could buy that I would actually enjoy better.

Thanks for the post!

Offline DreamingOfPizza

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2019, 02:46:41 PM »
Very good first attempt! Keep at it. You will notice every time you make a pie it will improve a little. I strongly suggest you buy a pizza stone or steel for much better results.

What temp are you baking at and how long?

Offline Rudeness

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2019, 04:41:22 PM »
Very good first attempt! Keep at it. You will notice every time you make a pie it will improve a little. I strongly suggest you buy a pizza stone or steel for much better results.

What temp are you baking at and how long?


oven dial goes to 500 then broil I had the dial somewhere between those two and cooked the pizzas for 8 minutes until crust was golden

Trying again tonight with heavier dough balls and higher thickness factor - I will post pictures.

Thanks!

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Offline Rudeness

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2019, 10:25:31 AM »
I doubled the weight of the doughballs to 500g and the pizza came out too thick this time - going to try 350 next pizza - also didn't dilute the sauce this time and pizza came out too salty and I could probably use less cheese


Offline DreamingOfPizza

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2019, 02:37:53 AM »
For thickness factor you should use the dough calculator on this site. Its great for typing in exactly what thickness factor you want and calculating how much ingredients you will need. Judging from info thrown around here a NY slice can be anywhere from .10 to .070 thickness factor. It will save you alot of trial and error for getting the right amount of dough for the size and thickness you are looking for. For me it is an essential tool to have for a home pizza maket.

Offline PizzAmateur

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2019, 01:11:15 AM »
For thickness factor you should use the dough calculator on this site. Its great for typing in exactly what thickness factor you want and calculating how much ingredients you will need. Judging from info thrown around here a NY slice can be anywhere from .10 to .070 thickness factor. It will save you alot of trial and error for getting the right amount of dough for the size and thickness you are looking for. For me it is an essential tool to have for a home pizza maket.

Sorry to pick on you DOP, but how does one determine the thickness factor they "want"?

I "have" determined my "thickness factor" by the amount of sauce/toppings I intend to add, but that has never given me a numerical digit that I could use.

Do I really need to measure the thickness of my dough to be able to use a "thickness factor"?

Or, the real question is, how do I correlate "thickness factor" to the pizzas that I make?  :-\ :)

Just another ignorant question from an ingnorant PizzAmateur.  ;D

Offline DreamingOfPizza

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2019, 04:20:54 PM »
Sorry to pick on you DOP, but how does one determine the thickness factor they "want"?

I "have" determined my "thickness factor" by the amount of sauce/toppings I intend to add, but that has never given me a numerical digit that I could use.

Do I really need to measure the thickness of my dough to be able to use a "thickness factor"?

Or, the real question is, how do I correlate "thickness factor" to the pizzas that I make?  :-\ :)

Just another ignorant question from an ingnorant PizzAmateur.  ;D
.
 Toppings are not included in thickness factor, it is based on how thick or thin the bread part of the pizza is. For NY pies you typically see slices in the range of .07 to .10 TF... That is just what the norm is around here for NY. Street slices might be closer to .10 while the "ny elite" slices are thinner in the .08 and .07 range.

 To determine what you want may require some testing or checking out other threads here and finding something that appeals to you. For me I just decided I will use the Lehmann recipe and adjust the thickness factor using the dough calculator on this site. I started off using .10 TF... Next time I used .09 TF and then I played around with .08 and .07 I decided I liked the .09 and .08 thickness slices the best.

 As long as you are using the dough calculator, input your bakers percentages and desired TF and desired pizza size you can use any recipe and customize the TF and size with the calculator. 

to answer your last question you don't need to physically measure anything, if you want to find out what TF you are currently using on your pies, measure your usual dough ball weight and note it, also if you know how many inches your usual pies are that is important to know too. simply input the bakers percentage of your recipe in the dough calculator and input the pizza size you usually make, Now adjust the TF value until you get the total dough ball weight that you noted earlier and that will be the tf value you normally use for your pies and you will notice all the other ingredients weight being totaled up in real time as you change TF values. Now that you know the TF value you can decide if you want to go up or down for your next pies and it will automatically adjust recipe for you.

I hope I explained that right.

« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 05:22:18 PM by DreamingOfPizza »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Rudeness's First Run at NYC pizza
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2019, 07:42:42 PM »
PizzAmateur,

What DreamingOfPizza stated about the thickness factor is correct. The advantage of the dough calculating tools is that you do not have to understand the math. It is hidden in the tools so you only have to enter a few numbers and the tools will produce the correct amounts of ingredients to use. However, to better understand the hidden math, you may want to read the following article that Tom Lehmann wrote that was archived in the Wayback Machine:

https://web.archive.org/web/20110820052532/http://pmq.com/mag/2004november_december/lehmann.php

In the above article, you will note that Tom does not use the "thickness factor" language. Rather, he uses the more technically correct language "dough loading factor". I was aware of that language when I worked on the design of the dough calculating tools but opted for the "thickness factor" language because I was afraid the our members, most of whom were home pizza makers, and very often not technically oriented, might not resonate with the dough loading factor concept. So, I elected to use the thickness factor wording.

It is also useful to note that different types of pizzas can use different thickness factors. To give you an idea as to possibilities, you might find it useful to look at Reply 1 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=12243.msg115759;topicseen#msg115759

Peter

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