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Offline Pod4477

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Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« on: April 15, 2019, 12:28:09 AM »
Pizza Shark talked about making one, and I really want to try building a coal fired oven type outdoor pizza oven.  Something with a fire chamber down below a cooking chamber up above.  Does anyone know how this might be achieved?  I'm thinking it would be similar to a regular WFO, but without the dome.  I'm also not sure what material would be best for the pizza to cook on.  I have about 10 fire bricks that aren't being used.  Thanks as always.  I also wouldn't burn coal fire oven coal, but probably lump charcoal.

Pizza Sharks idea:
"I am seriously considering building a little brick oven out back that I can burn coal in.  I think I can easily build the thing with firebrick and not even screw around with mortar and such.  I'll buy two custom 24" square x 2" thick baking stones to serve as the deck and the ceiling and basic firebrick for the walls.  I'll keep the coal fire underneath and vent the cumbustion gas up through some holes I'll drill in the perimeter of the deck with a carbide foundation drill and then out the center of the top through holes drilled.  It ain't gonna be fancy but I think it'll get the job done as I'm not gonna spend a fortune on one of those silly pre-fab back-yard brick ovens that are only wood burning to boot.  For the opening I'll simply use firebrick on edge.  The whole thing shouldn't be more than 24" x 24" x 24" tall."
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 12:45:24 AM by Pod4477 »

Offline norma427

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #1 on: April 15, 2019, 01:10:03 AM »
Pizza Shark talked about making one, and I really want to try building a coal fired oven type outdoor pizza oven.  Something with a fire chamber down below a cooking chamber up above.  Does anyone know how this might be achieved?  I'm thinking it would be similar to a regular WFO, but without the dome.  I'm also not sure what material would be best for the pizza to cook on.  I have about 10 fire bricks that aren't being used.  Thanks as always.  I also wouldn't burn coal fire oven coal, but probably lump charcoal.

Pizza Sharks idea:
"I am seriously considering building a little brick oven out back that I can burn coal in.  I think I can easily build the thing with firebrick and not even screw around with mortar and such.  I'll buy two custom 24" square x 2" thick baking stones to serve as the deck and the ceiling and basic firebrick for the walls.  I'll keep the coal fire underneath and vent the cumbustion gas up through some holes I'll drill in the perimeter of the deck with a carbide foundation drill and then out the center of the top through holes drilled.  It ain't gonna be fancy but I think it'll get the job done as I'm not gonna spend a fortune on one of those silly pre-fab back-yard brick ovens that are only wood burning to boot.  For the opening I'll simply use firebrick on edge.  The whole thing shouldn't be more than 24" x 24" x 24" tall."

Pod4477,

This isn't a coal fired oven setup, but Steve (Ev) had great results in his rigged BBQ grill set-up.  Just an idea.  :-D

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20006.0

Norma

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2019, 01:30:59 AM »
Pod4477,

This isn't a coal fired oven setup, but Steve (Ev) had great results in his rigged BBQ grill set-up.  Just an idea.  :-D

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20006.0

Norma

Thank you!  That is an awesome oven and very creative.  I might end up doing that!  I also found this video that I could adapt to my specs, if I decide to go the fire brick way:

I don't know where I heard that the coals go down below and vent up to the deck, but looking at Lombardi's, the fire looks to be to the right of the pizzas.  My idea was to make two openings and maybe even have a space between the two levels for heat to rise.  It may be tough to get temps around 600F if I do a two level construction.  Am I wrong or did some traditional coal fired ovens have the coal down below in a chamber and the deck above that?  Most I see today just cook the pizza next to the coals.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2019, 01:45:43 AM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2019, 09:44:07 AM »
Member Andrew Bellucci shows a home coal oven in use here:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=44189.0

And member shuboyje built one too. I dont think the build details were on this forum.  I could be wrong though. I want to say he used a refractory concrete for it but he has built several ovens and I could be mixing them up. Been a few years...

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=31780.0


Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #4 on: April 15, 2019, 11:09:11 PM »
Member Andrew Bellucci shows a home coal oven in use here:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=44189.0

And member shuboyje built one too. I dont think the build details were on this forum.  I could be wrong though. I want to say he used a refractory concrete for it but he has built several ovens and I could be mixing them up. Been a few years...

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=31780.0

Awesome thank you so much!  So there doesn't seem to be the type ovens I was thinking, where the fire is down below and heat travels up to a deck/cooking chamber above.  I like Andrew's design and it's a truly amazing oven.  There doesn't seem to be much difference between a coal fired oven and a WFO, despite the difference in the dome and chimneys.  I wonder if I could build that oven on a smaller scale, but being able to do 18-22" pies is important to me. 

I think I'm going to try building Andrew's design though. I wonder if installing a chimney/flue is a good idea as much needed heat from my first oven attempt will escape, but I know it's good to let smoke escape and for airflow, so I'm sure I will.  Andrew's chimney appears to just be on the back left of the oven.  I'm still learning about ovens, but I think I could make a something similar, especially following Andrew's design. 

Airflow below the coal grates will be important and it's funny how Ooni did the same thing.  It also seems Andrew used red bricks, and I wonder if I should use firebrick or old red bricks for the frame and cooking chamber.  Insulation is another point Andrew brought up, using sand for it.  I am thinking about how big I want the oven to be, but having a separate cooking chamber and fire box will allow me to make bigger pies.  I think installing doors will be the toughest and most expensive, besides all the bricks.

My idea is to use my firebrick for the floor/deck.  I don't know if it is low, medium, or heavy duty firebrick, but I believe I bought it at Lowes or Home Depot.  I think I will use clay bricks for the walls just due to the cost.  I'd like to find old clay bricks compared to new clay bricks if possible.  Any tips would be appreciated as I've never done this before, but I don't care how long it takes to make. 
« Last Edit: April 16, 2019, 01:13:00 AM by Pod4477 »

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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2019, 09:51:26 AM »
Awesome thank you so much!  So there doesn't seem to be the type ovens I was thinking, where the fire is down below and heat travels up to a deck/cooking chamber above.  I like Andrew's design and it's a truly amazing oven.  There doesn't seem to be much difference between a coal fired oven and a WFO, despite the difference in the dome and chimneys.  I wonder if I could build that oven on a smaller scale, but being able to do 18-22" pies is important to me. 

I think I'm going to try building Andrew's design though. I wonder if installing a chimney/flue is a good idea as much needed heat from my first oven attempt will escape, but I know it's good to let smoke escape and for airflow, so I'm sure I will.  Andrew's chimney appears to just be on the back left of the oven.  I'm still learning about ovens, but I think I could make a something similar, especially following Andrew's design. 

Airflow below the coal grates will be important and it's funny how Ooni did the same thing.  It also seems Andrew used red bricks, and I wonder if I should use firebrick or old red bricks for the frame and cooking chamber.  Insulation is another point Andrew brought up, using sand for it.  I am thinking about how big I want the oven to be, but having a separate cooking chamber and fire box will allow me to make bigger pies.  I think installing doors will be the toughest and most expensive, besides all the bricks.

My idea is to use my firebrick for the floor/deck.  I don't know if it is low, medium, or heavy duty firebrick, but I believe I bought it at Lowes or Home Depot.  I think I will use clay bricks for the walls just due to the cost.  I'd like to find old clay bricks compared to new clay bricks if possible.  Any tips would be appreciated as I've never done this before, but I don't care how long it takes to make.
If you were building a dome, wood fired oven I could provide some pointers. Other than eating pizza that came out of a coal oven, I have no experience with coal ovens. I thought the coal fire box was usually offset and down, but don't hold me to that. I would imagine controlling airflow is very important. I would guess that wall thickness (thermal mass) and insulation control your heat up time and heat retention.  One thing to watch out for is building an oven that takes 20 hours to heat up. That will ruin your Saturday.

Also, I think you would be better off finding a Masonry supply store near you than only shopping box stores. I dont think there is much call for fire brick at lowes or home depot. The ones near me only had very over priced fire brick splits. The supply store will have other things you need like high temp mortar (not cheap but Heat Stop 50 works well) or the ingredients to make a homebrew mortar.

One other piece of advice is offer is to put the oven floor at a height that won't make you be constantly hunched over. That tends to be around elbow height.

Good luck. And read as much on coal ovens as you can find. There might be some coal oven discussions at the Forno Bravo forum too.

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2019, 07:50:47 PM »
If you were building a dome, wood fired oven I could provide some pointers. Other than eating pizza that came out of a coal oven, I have no experience with coal ovens. I thought the coal fire box was usually offset and down, but don't hold me to that. I would imagine controlling airflow is very important. I would guess that wall thickness (thermal mass) and insulation control your heat up time and heat retention.  One thing to watch out for is building an oven that takes 20 hours to heat up. That will ruin your Saturday.

Also, I think you would be better off finding a Masonry supply store near you than only shopping box stores. I dont think there is much call for fire brick at lowes or home depot. The ones near me only had very over priced fire brick splits. The supply store will have other things you need like high temp mortar (not cheap but Heat Stop 50 works well) or the ingredients to make a homebrew mortar.

One other piece of advice is offer is to put the oven floor at a height that won't make you be constantly hunched over. That tends to be around elbow height.

Good luck. And read as much on coal ovens as you can find. There might be some coal oven discussions at the Forno Bravo forum too.

Thank you! Any help is much appreciated.  A dome is awesome, I just don't think I'd want to tackle that yet.  My idea is an oven 45"L x 28"D x 54"H.  The deck will be about 27"x 27", with the fire area being 18" wide or length.  I was thinking of not having it too low as well; awesome advice.  I definitely don't want a 20 hour heat up, so I'm thinking that Andrews oven took 90 minutes, so mine should be less since it's a bit smaller.  Funny you said that because I just went to a masonry supply store today.  They prices fire brick around 2.5 dollars each and clay brick around 80 cents each.  High temp mortar was about 55 bucks for the 50 lbs I believe.  I'll have to look at the discussions there thanks you! 

One thing I have to figure out is how to make the opening that Andrew had to store charcoal.  I'm not sure if I should even do that, as I don't want the many stray cats living in there haha.  But it cuts down on bricks.  I would just fear that it wouldn't be stable enough support there, since it's under the deck, and I always feel stacking bricks is better than anything floating, even with mortar.

I also need to figure out the foundation floor.  I have pavers that have been in there for a while and are fairly level.  I could put it on there, or I may just build a new area for the oven on dirt.  Is it usually practice to put down a concrete base first? 
« Last Edit: April 16, 2019, 07:53:37 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2019, 06:22:54 PM »
So my plan is to build a hybrid WFO and Coal fired oven, due to the fact that I need a big cooking area for 22" pizzas.  There has been some debate on the Forno Brovo forums as to whether or not coal fired ovens had a separate chamber for the coal or if the coals burned on or next to the deck using a grate or right on the deck.  My main question is using lump charcoal, do I need a grate system with ash bin below, and a blower? or can I just build a charcoal fire right on the deck?

The plan is to build a tad smaller version of Andrew's oven at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=44189.msg442042#msg442042
I'm not sure if I'm going to use the grates for the fire to be built on, or just make the oven one giant firebrick floor.  I'm leaning towards making it a giant firebrick floor and it being pretty much like many WFOs, but with a bigger deck.  The door/opening will be about 24" width to fit 22" pizzas in and out of, with a minimal height to keep heat in.  Basically my idea is to make a mix between Andrew's oven and the coal fired oven below:

1.  What should I make the top of the oven with, if making it a flat roof and not a dome?  Do I just use insulation and bricks?  Do anyone know what Andrew used for his room?
2.  Why is it important to use a blower with coal fired ovens, but not used in WFO? 
3.  Is airflow below the lump charcoal that important?  It seems to me that the lump could burn right on the firebrick, without air below it.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 07:16:06 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2019, 07:13:53 PM »
There doesn't seem to be much difference between a coal fired oven and a WFO, despite the difference in the dome and chimneys.  I wonder if I could build that oven on a smaller scale, but being able to do 18-22" pies is important to me. 

I think I'm going to try building Andrew's design though. I wonder if installing a chimney/flue is a good idea as much needed heat from my first oven attempt will escape, but I know it's good to let smoke escape and for airflow, so I'm sure I will.  Andrew's chimney appears to just be on the back left of the oven.  I'm still learning about ovens, but I think I could make a something similar, especially following Andrew's design. 

Airflow below the coal grates will be important and it's funny how Ooni did the same thing.  It also seems Andrew used red bricks, and I wonder if I should use firebrick or old red bricks for the frame and cooking chamber.  Insulation is another point Andrew brought up, using sand for it.  I am thinking about how big I want the oven to be, but having a separate cooking chamber and fire box will allow me to make bigger pies.  I think installing doors will be the toughest and most expensive, besides all the bricks.

My idea is to use my firebrick for the floor/deck.  I don't know if it is low, medium, or heavy duty firebrick, but I believe I bought it at Lowes or Home Depot.  I think I will use clay bricks for the walls just due to the cost.  I'd like to find old clay bricks compared to new clay bricks if possible.  Any tips would be appreciated as I've never done this before, but I don't care how long it takes to make.

It's a HUGE difference between a coal oven and a WFO. It's not just airflow below the coal grates; it's FORCED airflow. The entire fire management process is completely different too. Almost zero similarities.
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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2019, 07:15:25 PM »
I can't help with most of your questions. I can tell you that under my oven stand there is about a foot of compacted crusher run stone and the a concrete slab. My stand is already overkill. Footings below the frost line seemed really overkill since I was on well compacted sand.

For the roof, if you are building in Massachusetts, I would recommend having a slope to the roof. You want any rain or snow to flow off. A flat roof can pond and if it leaks, it will ruin your insulation. You can build a structure around the oven or put on a tin roof or build a shelter around the oven. You can look around at different oven structures and find something you like.

One other thing, I'm not into the lingo of coal ovens. When you say lump charcoal I think wood burnt down to coal for grilling. I'm assuming you are thinking coal like mined coal. Anthracite I think. No experience with it, but I've watched that Forged in Fire show and when they use coal, airflow is very important.

You are not too far from a few Pepe's locations. Might be worth getting a good look at one of those ovens for research...and a pizza.

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Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2019, 07:42:37 PM »
It's a HUGE difference between a coal oven and a WFO. It's not just airflow below the coal grates; it's FORCED airflow. The entire fire management process is completely different too. Almost zero similarities.

Awesome info, thank you.  I didn't realize the differences between coal fired ovens and WFO.  I also realized, in the past hour, that I should have clarified between coal fired and lump charcoal fired, which it seems Andrew is using and I probably would use.  I can see how forced airflow would be important with coal, and I wonder if this would be important for lump charcoal.  With lump charcoal being wood, I feel that it could be used directly on the deck as in a wood fired oven.  So why did Andrew put it on grates?  I wonder if it was just for increased airflow or just ash management.

I can't help with most of your questions. I can tell you that under my oven stand there is about a foot of compacted crusher run stone and the a concrete slab. My stand is already overkill. Footings below the frost line seemed really overkill since I was on well compacted sand.

For the roof, if you are building in Massachusetts, I would recommend having a slope to the roof. You want any rain or snow to flow off. A flat roof can pond and if it leaks, it will ruin your insulation. You can build a structure around the oven or put on a tin roof or build a shelter around the oven. You can look around at different oven structures and find something you like.

One other thing, I'm not into the lingo of coal ovens. When you say lump charcoal I think wood burnt down to coal for grilling. I'm assuming you are thinking coal like mined coal. Anthracite I think. No experience with it, but I've watched that Forged in Fire show and when they use coal, airflow is very important.

You are not too far from a few Pepe's locations. Might be worth getting a good look at one of those ovens for research...and a pizza.

Awesome info too, thank you!  My goal is really to replicate the Pizzeria Regina coal/gas fired oven in the North End of Boston.  Of course, I wouldn't do gas, so I wanted to go back to how PR used coal, but probably use lump charcoal instead.  I've had awesome results using lump in my Uuni Pro, but I wanted a bigger oven to do 22" pizzas.  I'll have to decide on whether or not I do a grate system for the lump charcoal or just burn it right on the deck.

The stone and concrete slab are similar to what is recommended in the book "Bread Earth and Fire": Earth Ovens and Artisan Breads
By Stuart Silverstein.  He recommends filling with gravel, rocks, and rubble, followed by 10" of dry medium perlite, and on top of that 2 inches of a mix of perlite and Portland cement.  He places solid concrete blocks on top of that, and then firebricks on top of the blocks.  I was surprised to read that there is no need to mortar between the concrete blocks that make up the walls, and that he stuccos the four walls with surface bonding cement.  Overkill is always good.

My idea is to make this base pretty big, and then make the firebrick the entire inside of the blocks.  Then I'd build around the firebrick.  I'll make a mockup. I was debating using coal, but the health concerns are not worth it.  A slope is an awesome idea, and I have a mason friend who is going to help, so I won't be going in alone.  For the roof, what is the typical materials if not making a mud and perlite dome?  Could you do it with just bricks?  Andrew's looked like this, but I couldn't tell.

The concrete ground slab is about 6 ft x 5 ft. also.

 I definitely will visit Pepes and maybe even the CT location, if not the MA ones.  Thank you for the recommendation.  We have a bunch of coal fired places around me, but I always look for the original.  Pizzeria Regina was even coal fired back then I believe.  The oven design I'm thinking is similar to Pepes, with a fire door on the right and a main door in the middle.  I may try to replicate this two door setup, just for emptying out and adding charcoal.
https://pepespizzeria.com/photos-by-tom-mcgovern-2/
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 07:59:14 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2019, 07:58:18 PM »
Not familiar with the Pizzeria Regina ovens. If you are going to use lump wood charcoal, i think you might as well just burn hardwood logs down. That's all a bag of royal oak is.

Just to clarify, I was describing the slab at the bottom of my oven. My stand is similar to the one in the Forno Bravo Pompeii oven plans.  So from the existing sand there is 12 inches of compacted crusher run, plastic barrier, 5.5 inch thick reinforced concrete stab, stacked block (some cells filled with bar and concrete, I think it was 5 courses), a reinforced concrete slab, 3.5 inches of perlcrete 2 inches of insulation board, oven floor/dome, insulation blankets and loose perlite. The whole thing is covered by a structure (which still needs finish work).

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2019, 08:16:52 PM »
Not familiar with the Pizzeria Regina ovens. If you are going to use lump wood charcoal, i think you might as well just burn hardwood logs down. That's all a bag of royal oak is.

Just to clarify, I was describing the slab at the bottom of my oven. My stand is similar to the one in the Forno Bravo Pompeii oven plans.  So from the existing sand there is 12 inches of compacted crusher run, plastic barrier, 5.5 inch thick reinforced concrete stab, stacked block (some cells filled with bar and concrete, I think it was 5 courses), a reinforced concrete slab, 3.5 inches of perlcrete 2 inches of insulation board, oven floor/dome, insulation blankets and loose perlite. The whole thing is covered by a structure (which still needs finish work).

I believe they just use gas now anyway. The result is an oven around 600F and no live flame.  I may need to place fire bricks in between the pizza and the fire to replicate this, as it worked good in my Uuni.  I definitely may just use wood logs and found that the best time to replicate PR is to do it when the flames have gone down. 

Amazing oven you built.  I really appreciate the breakdown of your construction, and there are some similarities.  I'm still new to this, so I insanely appreciate it.  So if I decide to use concrete blocks for the firebricks to sit on, do you think I need high temp mortar to hold them, or can they just be layed down loose, along with loose firebrick for the oven floor?  I also see you used concrete and bar in your 5 course block.  Do you think this is better than the stucco described in the book? 

Also, I'm assuming if I make a brick wall and roof, I would need high temp mortar.  The book also mentions calcium silicate board or sand being used for insulation, was this the same insulation board you used?
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 08:29:51 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2019, 08:30:08 PM »


I believe they just use gas now anyway. The result is an oven around 600F and no live flame.  I may need to place fire bricks in between the pizza and the fire to replicate this, as it worked good in my Uuni.  I definitely may just use wood logs and found that the best time to replicate PR is to do it when the flames have gone down. 

Amazing oven you built.  I really appreciate the breakdown of your construction.  I'm still new to this, so I insanely appreciate it.  So if I decide to use concrete blocks below the firebricks, do you think I need high temp mortar to hold them, or can they just be layed down loose, along with loose firebrick for the oven floor?  I have heard of using high temp mortar, but the book doesn't even use it.

You only need the high temp mortar for the oven itself. I went with enough insulation under the oven floor that I dont think the supporting concrete slab ever gets above ambient temperature. I'd get enough insulation between your oven floor and any concrete for it not to matter. Typical concrete doesn't do well with high temperatures. My father in law put together a little concrete block U shape about 3 courses high for burning brush. The blocks are crumbling. They are just not meant for that.

When I fired the oven before the enclosure was built, inside the oven was 800 plus and the outer layer of blanket was 90. The modern insulation is pretty impressive.

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2019, 08:44:25 PM »

You only need the high temp mortar for the oven itself. I went with enough insulation under the oven floor that I dont think the supporting concrete slab ever gets above ambient temperature. I'd get enough insulation between your oven floor and any concrete for it not to matter. Typical concrete doesn't do well with high temperatures. My father in law put together a little concrete block U shape about 3 courses high for burning brush. The blocks are crumbling. They are just not meant for that.

When I fired the oven before the enclosure was built, inside the oven was 800 plus and the outer layer of blanket was 90. The modern insulation is pretty impressive.

Crumbling is my worst nightmare lol.  Good to know about the high temp mortar, thank you.  I will use it if I make a ceiling and walls from brick as Andrew it.  So the book mentions using more mass for bread and less for pizza.  I'm trying to decide on what I should use under the firebrick.  I'm confused about one thing.  Is it best to go from oven floor: firebrick, insulation board, perlcrete, and then concrete slab that it all sits on?

Or better to use firebrick, concrete, and then insulation?  The book shows the order as firebrick, solid concrete block, Portland cement, and then insulation.  Good to know the modern insulation is impressive, so I'm thinking I'd use that.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 08:49:45 PM by Pod4477 »

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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2019, 08:52:50 PM »
I'd insulate just below the floor. You want the heat in the oven. So floor, insulation, slab.

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2019, 09:02:34 PM »
I'd insulate just below the floor. You want the heat in the oven. So floor, insulation, slab.

Thank you.  I just downloaded the Forno Bravo oven instructions.  I see how they filled the block with concrete and bar, and I wonder if this is better than the stucco in the book.  I know nothing about FB board.  Where is the best place to buy FB board and I'm assuming it can be cut to size?  It also seems the book is adding the extra blocks for bread baking, but not needed for me.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2019, 09:09:18 PM by Pod4477 »

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2019, 09:16:47 PM »
I got my board and blanket from Harbison Walker. One thing to note, that the boards I used needs to be kept dry. Insboard I think. I had everything covered up all the time with a system of tarps and a 10x10 pop up tent. I think other brands are more forgiving. Perhaps VTsteve will chime in. I know he used a different insulation than I did.

Offline Pod4477

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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #18 on: April 20, 2019, 09:35:17 PM »
I got my board and blanket from Harbison Walker. One thing to note, that the boards I used needs to be kept dry. Insboard I think. I had everything covered up all the time with a system of tarps and a 10x10 pop up tent. I think other brands are more forgiving. Perhaps VTsteve will chime in. I know he used a different insulation than I did.

Thank you.  Really good to know about moisture with it.  I think I may do a hybrid of the book and the Forno Bravo build.  I don't want storage underneath, due to animals and annoyance.  It's nice to have, but I don't need it.  I'm going to draw up an updated mockup.  I need to decide on ceiling and oven walls, but most likely will be brick.  I'm assuming it will need high temp mortar then on the walls and ceiling.  The stand will be all cement block.  I will probably use FB board and then firebrick.  I'm happy to know I can lay the blocks out dry and then have my friend come in to help with the brick oven masonry.  He's also going to help with the foundation.  My biggest issues will be:
1.  Oven wall and ceiling setup
2.  2 door setup, but not as complicated as it feels
3.  Covering the oven from the elements.   

Offline Pod4477

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  • Location: Massachusetts
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Re: Wanting to build a coal fired style outdoor pizza oven
« Reply #19 on: April 21, 2019, 12:40:38 AM »
Rough plans with 4 course 8x8x16 blocks and possible brick walls for the oven.  A main door could go in the opening and a fire door possibly.  I may have to go smaller for the firebrick cooking area, as 48"x48" is quite large.  I think 31.5" is recommended in the book.  If I go smaller, I will have to build brick on top of the insulation, which could expose some insulation to weather.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2019, 01:39:57 AM by Pod4477 »

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