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Online pizzainthe6ix

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Activating CY
« on: May 15, 2019, 06:18:27 AM »
What is the best water temperature to activate CY?  I have read 90-100F.  Will it foam and froth up without sugar?  Can I omit the sugar?

Offline Rolls

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2019, 08:19:32 AM »
Compressed Yeast does not need to be dissolved in water before it is added to the rest of the dough ingredients and can be crumbled directly over the flour.  If you still want to dissolve it in water before using, just make sure you don't leave it sitting for too long as this can have a negative effect on the yeast.


Rolls
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Online pizzainthe6ix

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2019, 08:50:30 AM »
Compressed Yeast does not need to be dissolved in water before it is added to the rest of the dough ingredients and can be crumbled directly over the flour.  If you still want to dissolve it in water before using, just make sure you don't leave it sitting for too long as this can have a negative effect on the yeast.


Rolls
Interesting.  Every single recipe I have seen before shows this being dissolved/melted in water

Offline Rolls

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2019, 09:23:24 AM »
Compressed Yeast contains about 70% water, which is what makes it more perishable than other forms of "dry" yeast.  This relatively high moisture content allows the yeast to be easily integrated into the dough mass.  Many recipes, such as most of the Neapolitan pizza videos on youtube, show the CY being dissolved into the water before the other ingredients are added.  I suspect this has more to do with tradition rather than any particular requirement to "activate" the yeast or even to disperse it evenly throughout the mix.  As I said before, there's no harm in dissolving the CY in water, provided you don't leave it there so long that osmotic pressure begins to rupture the cell walls of the yeast, killing them, and releasing glutathione (a reducing agent) into the dough.  Be not afraid to crumble the compressed yeast directly onto the flour. It will be fine.


Rolls 
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2019, 09:47:11 AM »
Rolls is absolutely correct, one thing I might add though is is you are mixing your dough totally by hand it is easier to incorporate the compressed yeast (CY) if you first suspend it in the dough water. Otherwise, just crumble it on top of the flour and begin mixing.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Online pizzainthe6ix

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2019, 04:46:46 PM »
Rolls is absolutely correct, one thing I might add though is is you are mixing your dough totally by hand it is easier to incorporate the compressed yeast (CY) if you first suspend it in the dough water. Otherwise, just crumble it on top of the flour and begin mixing.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
I start the mix by hand and have been "melting" it in water that is 95-100F....oops ;-)

What happens if CY and salt are mixed?  I see a lot of people mix in yeast/preferment and salt, water and oil all together

Also, what do you mean to "suspend" the yeast

Offline Yael

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2019, 08:32:46 PM »
Rolls, it's been a while we didn't hear from you  :P
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2019, 10:08:56 PM »
Compressed yeast is an agglomerate of billions of yeast cells, it is not melted, nor is it dissolved, it is suspended in water (that's the correct term).
While yeast and salt can be put together in water it is generally not a good idea since if you get too much salt in the water it will damage the yeast impairing its ability to ferment. The same can be said for sugar too, so, while not necessarily deleterious to the yeast it is not a good idea to put the salt and yeast together in the water. When making sponges for making bread it is common to put salt into the sponge to help control the rate of fermentation of the sponge. A sponge for bread making will typically contain 60 to 80% of the total flour, all or most of the yeast, salt can be from none to 2% of the total flour weight and water at 50 to 55% of the weight of the flour in the sponge.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline quietdesperation

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2019, 10:30:48 PM »
What is the best water temperature to activate CY?  I have read 90-100F.  Will it foam and froth up without sugar?  Can I omit the sugar?

I think the point of adding sugar and seeing if it froths is to "prove the yeast" (make sure the yeast is alive).
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And most particular thing?" - sweeney todd

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2019, 11:03:47 AM »
I think the point of adding sugar and seeing if it froths is to "prove the yeast" (make sure the yeast is alive).
QD,

If you go to the yeast producers websites and look at the recipes, you will very often see that "proofing" or "proving" the yeast, which is often used in large amounts (like 7 grams), is part of the recipes themselves. For example, see this recipe from the Red Star website:

https://redstaryeast.com/recipes/homemade-pizza-crust/

Peter

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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2019, 11:57:15 AM »
Peter;
This is a good example of where IDY is suspended in warm water and allowed to hydrate/activate prior to addition to the dough as it covers both bases for hand and machine mixing of the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline quietdesperation

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2019, 12:36:36 PM »
QD,

If you go to the yeast producers websites and look at the recipes, you will very often see that "proofing" or "proving" the yeast, which is often used in large amounts (like 7 grams), is part of the recipes themselves. For example, see this recipe from the Red Star website:

https://redstaryeast.com/recipes/homemade-pizza-crust/

Peter

thanks peter, I believe tony g in the pizza bible recommends "proving yeast" for small batches made in a home setting. As Tom suggests, Tony does use the "proved yeast" in his formulation. Maybe it's a common practice in a commercial setting but not really necessary in a home setting? 

Given tom's finding that there's no benefit to the finished product in using one yeast product (idy, ady, compressed) over another, I've always opted for IDY. As such, I have no hands-on experience with cy.

best,
« Last Edit: May 18, 2019, 01:17:09 PM by quietdesperation »
"Is that a pie fit for a king
A wondrous sweet
And most particular thing?" - sweeney todd

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2019, 03:08:57 PM »
"Proving the yeast" is rarely done in a pizzeria setting and never done in a commercial setting here in the U.S. I Europe the practice is more common.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Activating CY
« Reply #13 on: May 18, 2019, 04:44:57 PM »
thanks peter, I believe tony g in the pizza bible recommends "proving yeast" for small batches made in a home setting. As Tom suggests, Tony does use the "proved yeast" in his formulation. Maybe it's a common practice in a commercial setting but not really necessary in a home setting? 
QD,

I personally have never proved yeast that I can recall. And, like Tom said, it is not a practice in a typical pizzeria or commercial setting. And the only places where I have read about proving yeast in a home setting has been for dough recipes at the websites of yeast producers--like the recipe I cited. Those recipes hold little appeal to our members inasmuch as they are more interested in making pizza dough like the professionals make. As for Tony G, I can see how he might suggest proving yeast in a home setting to be sure that the people who try his dough recipes don't fail because they did not take care of their yeasts properly. Otherwise, they might blame him or his recipe, which would not be good for sales of his book.

As for cake yeast itself, it has been a long time since I last used that type of yeast because the stores around me no longer sell that form of yeast.

Peter

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