A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Quick Proofing Question  (Read 243 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline NorthPilot06

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13
  • Location: DFW Metroplex
  • I Love Pizza!
Quick Proofing Question
« on: May 15, 2019, 02:50:22 PM »
Hey guys - quick question on best practices.  What's the best way to proof dough?

The reason why I ask is because I mixed up a batch of the neopolitan "emergency" dough recipe, immediately balled the dough (after kneading), then covered with a towel.  A few hours later, the dough was perfectly proofed (borderline overproofed), but there was a dry "skin" on the outside of the balls that you couldn't just knead back in.

How do I prevent this going forward?

Offline Arne_Jervell

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 246
  • Location: Norway
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Quick Proofing Question
« Reply #1 on: May 15, 2019, 04:33:37 PM »
The towel, was it damp or dry? When using a towel to cover the dough I think you should wet it slightly to prevent the skin you're talking about.

I always cover tight in cling film, to prevent any such drying.

Offline NorthPilot06

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 13
  • Location: DFW Metroplex
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Quick Proofing Question
« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2019, 04:47:02 PM »
The towel was very slightly damp.  But I could try with a more damp towel - I actually had the dough balls rising on a sheet pan so I was trying to avoid a damp/wet towel coming into contact with the dough balls.  Perhaps I need a different proofing container.

And there's no impact of restricting airflow for proofing?  e.g. the proofing process produces CO2, but with an airtight seal, that CO2 can't escape.  That doesn't cause any issues?  Thanks!

Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 25606
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Pizza is not bread.
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Quick Proofing Question
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2019, 06:36:00 PM »
You can't create an airtight seal with plastic wrap, not that it matters.

Cheap plastic twist-tie food bags are a great option. A quick spritz of spray oil in the bag, drop in the ball, squeeze out the air, give the bag a quick twist at the top, and tuck the very top of the bag under the ball.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Brent-r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 230
  • Location: Caledon, Ontario
  • Love the wood fired oven
Re: Quick Proofing Question
« Reply #4 on: May 17, 2019, 03:03:32 PM »
I've had good short term luck with a very wet dish towel ... not quite dripping wet, for both pizza and bread doughs.   Also you could oil your and and caress the dough balls with love.

the food bags (with or without a little oil to help get them out ) are best
Brent

A D V E R T I S E M E N T