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Author Topic: What style Sicilian is this?  (Read 284 times)

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Offline AnotherOneBitesTheCrust

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  • Location: Upstate NY
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What style Sicilian is this?
« on: July 20, 2019, 12:19:05 PM »
... And how do I make it?

Long story short, there was a pizzaria back home that made the most amazing square slices growing up.  It still exists, but I moved away over a decade ago and have missed it ever since.  I've made pizza/bread since I was a kid with my Grandparents, but recreating this pizza is what really kicked off my passion for pizza.

I've only ever found 2 places that make it like this in my travels. 

Philly and a Place called Brooklyn Joe's in Western NY.

What I know.. Or think I know.

It doesn't have the fried bottom, like most Sicilians I make.

Im 99% sure it's par baked, from what I remember seeing, and I don't belive it's a quick park bake.  I remember them baking in sheet pans and popping large bubbles that former.

I believe it is a lower hydration dough.  I know Angelo's in South Philly makes Italian bread and Sicilian out of the same dough, and I belive these places use their NYC style dough for their square pies. 

I will get better shots of the crumb, and bottom next time I go.

It's crisp, with a chewy outer rim, and tiger bread like interior.


Their slices are usually charred a little heavier, which I enjoy.

I am going to experiment with my NY dough next time, and light crisco/oil in the pan next time.  But hoping someone can point me in the right direction.



« Last Edit: July 20, 2019, 12:20:47 PM by AnotherOneBitesTheCrust »

Offline megan45

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Re: What style Sicilian is this?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2019, 07:50:32 PM »
It's crisp, with a chewy outer rim, and tiger bread like interior.

"Tiger" or "tighter"? Assuming you meant "tighter," that description fit the crust of the pizza I made a few of days ago to a T.

Try kneading the dough longer, and hold off on adding the oil until the flour is fully hydrated, then mix it in fairly aggressively. (I usually mix by hand and add the oil up front, but I wanted to see how the NutriMill Artiste did with a higher hydration dough. The crust was fine: quite tasty, actually, but not the texture I'm after in a Sicilian pie. My preference is for an open, airy crumb, which this was decidedly not.)

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