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Author Topic: Caribbean Oven  (Read 1150 times)

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Offline stonecutter

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Caribbean Oven
« on: August 07, 2019, 10:28:07 PM »
Hey Everyone, long time no talk! Well, Iím finally beginning the process of building another oven...this time in the Caribbean.  I was happy I documented the process of some of my other builds here and there on the interweb so I could look back on them. So Iím starting another thread here documenting this build.

There are no suppliers of refractory materials here on the island, so everything is being bought off island and shipped in.  I have a local contact with a supply chain and so Iím working with him to get what I need.

The plan is to build something around 30Ē because of space, occasional use, etc etc...I donít need a large oven and I usually only bake one pizza at a time. 

Iím having the contractor we hired for all the work we are doing take care of the block work for the oven. I donít have time and itís not that critical. The masonry done on the island is...well....marginal at best (see attached pictures) and not even close to what should be considered best practice.  But, they are masters at stucco (read: hide horrible masonry) and the stand and cabinet boxes are all stucco, so ther you go.  Hereís where we are right now with the kitchen part of the pavilion...plus the view from the inside.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2019, 10:29:16 PM »
Thisíll be a long process with shipping time and me finding time to build. We are heading to Europe for a month again so Iíll be looking for inspiration there too!
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2019, 06:56:45 AM »
Looks like a great location for a pizza oven.  Will you have trouble finding wood to burn in it or will the local woods be okay?

Offline foreplease

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2019, 09:32:06 PM »
I really enjoy seeing your projects and some of the things you have visited in your travels. Thank you for continuing to post about them.
-Tony

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2019, 09:09:41 PM »
Looks like a great location for a pizza oven.  Will you have trouble finding wood to burn in it or will the local woods be okay?

Thanks Barry. No, wood wonít be a problem to source. The island is full of oak and few other nice hard wood species and itís readily available...plus we had several cut down on our lot for this project so thatíll hold me for a while.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

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Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2019, 09:12:51 PM »
I really enjoy seeing your projects and some of the things you have visited in your travels. Thank you for continuing to post about them.

Thank you! We are headed back to Europe for a month on Wednesday and this time we will stop in Naples on our way to Amalfi.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2019, 01:18:53 AM »
More progress..oven and Argentine  parilla to start in a month or so
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline barryvabeach

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2019, 07:04:22 AM »
Looks like the work is coming along nicely.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2019, 11:21:34 PM »
Your place is amazing!
Jon

ďThe two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.Ē            -Mark Twain

If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline wotavidone

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #9 on: September 29, 2019, 08:31:22 AM »
The plan is to build something around 30Ē because of space, occasional use, etc etc...I donít need a large oven and I usually only bake one pizza at a time. 
I remember a bloke saying all that a few years back.
Me.  ;D

So I built a 29.5 inch oven for myself, then I helped a mate build one 4 inches bigger, then I helped another mate build a 37.5 inch oven.
From this I learned:
As the oven gets bigger it requires more wood to heat the higher thermal mass, but doesn't take much longer to heat because you can fit more fire in the bigger oven.
All three ovens built from similar materials and same design scaled to maintain all the important ratios. The largest is by far the easiest to cook in and performs the best. Bigger ovens are easier to work.
All round ovens 3 feet and under are single pizza ovens unless you are very proficient (expert level) at pizza making.
When you inevitably decide you need to slow roast a large chunk of dead animal in your wood oven, 30 inches puts said dead animal too close to the bricks and or coals.
It can all be done with a 30 inch oven, but I always recommend/urge going a few inches bigger.

I would, however settle for 30 inches if the oven floor is square rather than round.
27% more area in a 30 x 30 square floor than a 30 inch round floor.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 08:37:15 AM by wotavidone »
Mick

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Offline foreplease

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2019, 11:39:01 AM »
Good to see you posting again wotavidone. I had begun to think of you as whereavubeen. :)
-Tony

Offline wotavidone

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2019, 09:09:58 AM »
Good to see you posting again wotavidone. I had begun to think of you as whereavubeen. :)
Yeah, i'm still here. Things have been pretty busy here and I've just started another project. Since one of the kids moved back home I can't even get to my oven due to all the junk he brought with him, so the pizza side of life went quiet.
Mick

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2019, 09:27:04 AM »


Since one of the kids moved back home I can't even get to my oven due to all the junk he brought with him, so the pizza side of life went quiet.

That sounds like grounds for eviction.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2019, 11:58:59 AM »

All round ovens 3 feet and under are single pizza ovens unless you are very proficient (expert level) at pizza making.
When you inevitably decide you need to slow roast a large chunk of dead animal in your wood oven, 30 inches puts said dead animal too close to the bricks and or coals.
It can all be done with a 30 inch oven, but I always recommend/urge going a few inches bigger.

I would, however settle for 30 inches if the oven floor is square rather than round.

I just need to let the available floor space dictate the oven size since that canít be changed. Iíve built 3 for myself that ranged from 32-38Ē on the inside and Iíve also had a 70x70 cm pizza party oven. Typically I only do one pizza at a time anyway so space for more isnít really a concern.  If Iím roasting anything itíll probably be in the Parilla, unless itís in a pan or something like that. Thanks for the input.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline wotavidone

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2019, 12:29:55 PM »
I just need to let the available floor space dictate the oven size since that canít be changed. Iíve built 3 for myself that ranged from 32-38Ē on the inside and Iíve also had a 70x70 cm pizza party oven. Typically I only do one pizza at a time anyway so space for more isnít really a concern.  If Iím roasting anything itíll probably be in the Parilla, unless itís in a pan or something like that. Thanks for the input.
I've seen your builds, i reckon. Always nice work.
You've gotta build what you can fit obviously, and you've had plenty of practice, you know the game.

My comments were more for other potential builders, really, and a bit of a laugh at my past self.
If you can, bigger is better, up to a point without being silly. (No sense having to use a whole pickup load of wood.)
And I only advocate it just because it really is easier to work in the bigger ovens, not to do multiple pizzas.
I suppose I could try to get that proficient, but home pizza ovens are about quality food and the social side for me, not high volume production.

I've dreamed of a parilla on occasion. Maybe one day.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2019, 12:38:50 PM by wotavidone »
Mick

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Offline wotavidone

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2019, 12:35:30 PM »

That sounds like grounds for eviction.
Managed to get at my oven and cook half a dozen pizzas last night.
I've been cooking acceptable pizza on a stone under the broiler, but man even after months of no practice, wood oven pizza is just plain at another level.
You just can't beat a full on brick oven with a rolling flame.
It will always be the gold standard for me.
Mick

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #16 on: October 07, 2019, 12:46:15 PM »
I've seen your builds, i reckon. Always nice work.
You've gotta build what you can fit obviously, and you've had plenty of practice, you know the game.

My comments were more for other potential builders, really, and a bit of a laugh at my past self.
If you can, bigger is better, up to a point without being silly. (No sense having to use a whole pickup load of wood.)
And I only advocate it just because it really is easier to work in the bigger ovens, not to do multiple pizzas.
I suppose I could try to get that proficient, but home pizza ovens are about quality food and the social side for me, not high volume production.

I've dreamed of a parilla on occasion. Maybe one day.

I hear you and what you said was all good suggestions. I certainly donít know it all thatís for sure.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #17 on: October 07, 2019, 01:22:43 PM »
Managed to get at my oven and cook half a dozen pizzas last night.
I've been cooking acceptable pizza on a stone under the broiler, but man even after months of no practice, wood oven pizza is just plain at another level.
You just can't beat a full on brick oven with a rolling flame.
It will always be the gold standard for me.
There definitely is something to the wood fired experience. I find the whole process enjoyable.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #18 on: March 05, 2020, 07:37:26 AM »
Build stopped in its tracks. The guy that had contacts for getting refractory to the island suddenly passed away before we lined up the order. Really tragic for his family. Anyhow, Iím looking into other options. I was thinking another pizza party until I heard back that they donít ship outside Europe anymore and I looked into one of Antoines Ovens but it was way too expensive to bring in. This may take a while to find an option that makes sense.  Anyhow, hereís a picture of the area from the first pics.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

Offline stonecutter

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Re: Caribbean Oven
« Reply #19 on: March 21, 2020, 01:02:29 PM »
Iíve decided to turn lemons into lemonade. The whole island is in lockdown right now...curfew is in place, stores shut, everything closed except clinics and utilities.  So I find myself with something that I havenít had in a very long time...time for myself!

What do I do with it..hmm. Iím doing something that Iíve been wanting to for a while now and thatís build a mud oven.  Iíve got a good size property for the island (.65 acre) and it has clay rich soil. Iíve begun the process of refining clay out of the silt and sand and itís been pretty cool to see results for my labor.  I did one batch about 4 days ago and got a nice yield of clay.  I think Iím going to make bricks and a biscotti like floor tile, with bottle insulation for the floor and cob insulation.  This should get interesting..lol
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
John Ruskin

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