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Author Topic: How to get dough to be consistent?  (Read 182 times)

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Offline Lukenick1

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How to get dough to be consistent?
« on: September 07, 2019, 01:34:49 PM »
Been making greek pan pizza for 25 years however I am not the pizza maker just the wife.  ha ha . Anyhow I am never satisfied with our pizza because its never the same.  My husband makes the dough although I do not know the exact measurements of ingredients I do know he uses water, sugar, salt, oil,  yeast (about 1/3 of a block of yeast) to a 50lb bag of Hummer flour.  He lets it rise for about an hour or so in the mixing bowl then cuts it, balls it and in the walk in cooler it goes.  Stays there a couple hours then he opens them in the pan.  The only way to get them to rise to be fluffy dough in the middle before cooking is to let them sit at room temp stacked until ready to be cooked.  We used to pre sauce them but I feel it makes the dough gummy.  We have been cooking in our Blodgett conveyor oven for 25 years now.  Lately we are getting burnt spots so something is up with the oven and we need to get that addressed.  Any how would love to hear any advice about what would help make the pizzas more consistent. 
PS we are required by state health code to keep our walk in cooler at 36 degrees which is way too cold but we have no choice. 

Offline Yael

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Re: How to get dough to be consistent?
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2019, 08:18:30 PM »
Hi,

I don't have all your replies but in order to get more consistency you should be more precise when you make your dough, and as Tom Lehmann would say, your recipe has to become a formula: you have to weigh everything (in grams), if possible check all the temperatures (finished dough, room, fridge...), and be consistent in all the timings (example: today you let the dough half an hour more than usual, you think it's no big deal, but today is 5° hotter than usual and you didn't pay attention but you added more yeast in the dough... So today the dough inflated much more than usual... You know what I mean?). So when your result is different from one time to another, if you are consistent in your procedure, you should be able to spot which stage is failing (at least, which one is not).

I hope this advice can help you!
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

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