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Author Topic: Pizza dough - 2 and 3 days cold ferment  (Read 670 times)

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Offline NiekBBQ

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Pizza dough - 2 and 3 days cold ferment
« on: September 16, 2019, 09:46:37 AM »
I'am having a bbq event this upcoming weekend. I want to make Pizza on friday and saterday on a Uuni 3.

Next wednesday I want to make my dough, form into balls and put in the fridge until friday ánd saterday.

Most likely I will form the balls on wednesday evening and put them in containers in de fridge.

Is this possible? How to do this properly? What are the possible faillures?


Offline Yael

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Re: Pizza dough - 2 and 3 days cold ferment
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2019, 09:53:10 AM »
Of course no problem, if properly managed you can even keep them 10 days and more.
Just be sure that your cold is steady and cold (2-4°C at heart of the dough ball).
Take the dough out a couple of hours before baking so it's at room temperature.
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza dough - 2 and 3 days cold ferment
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2019, 12:53:39 PM »
Just make sure you ball the dough immediately after mixing (finished dough temperature 70 to 75F), and leave the containers OPEN for at least two hours after placing them into the fridge, then lid. It is suggeated that you lightly oil the top of each dough ball after placing in the fermentation container as this will prevent the dough from drying out during the time its uncovered. When you remove the dough from the fridge for final use allow the dough balls to warm to an internal temperature in the 55 to 60F/12.7 to 15.5C range before beginning to open them into skins. Once the dough balls have reached the target temperature range they should remain good to use for a period of 2 to 3-hours. Just remember to keep them cover to prevent drying after you remove them from the fridge.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline NiekBBQ

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Re: Pizza dough - 2 and 3 days cold ferment
« Reply #3 on: September 16, 2019, 02:29:08 PM »
Thank you guys for the quick reply!

Just make sure you ball the dough immediately after mixing (finished dough temperature 70 to 75F), and leave the containers OPEN for at least two hours after placing them into the fridge, then lid. It is suggeated that you lightly oil the top of each dough ball after placing in the fermentation container as this will prevent the dough from drying out during the time its uncovered. When you remove the dough from the fridge for final use allow the dough balls to warm to an internal temperature in the 55 to 60F/12.7 to 15.5C range before beginning to open them into skins. Once the dough balls have reached the target temperature range they should remain good to use for a period of 2 to 3-hours. Just remember to keep them cover to prevent drying after you remove them from the fridge.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

So the dough never will reach a higher temperature than 24C during fermentation?
I thought that after mixing, you first need 2 hours of fermentation at room temp. After that you punch out the air and form balls.

Can I just use 1kg of Tipo 00 flour with 7 gr of dry yeast? Of use less yeast?

Tomorrow I will buy plastic cup containers. Wich size is recommended?
« Last Edit: September 16, 2019, 02:34:37 PM by NiekBBQ »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza dough - 2 and 3 days cold ferment
« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2019, 09:37:07 PM »
With 1Kg. of flour weight you will need to use approximately 3.75-grams of IDY or 5-grams of ADY when using the dough management procedure I've described. 7-grams would be WWAAYY too much.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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