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Author Topic: Is it safe to put dough back on the fridge?  (Read 191 times)

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Offline maijimenez

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Is it safe to put dough back on the fridge?
« on: December 03, 2019, 09:31:36 PM »
Hi all, hope you guys could help me with this newbie predicament I'm having.

I did CF on my dough for about 24hrs and took it out of the fridge to get to room temp before baking them. However, something important came up and pizza making was postponed - so my question is, will it be safe to put the dough back in the fridge after it has gotten to room temp (around 28-30C - I live in the tropics :))? so it'd be like fridge -> room temp -> fridge again. I know fermentation is going to get affected, but I'm also concerned about it being still safe to eat if ever I'd take it out and get it to room temp again.  ???

Btw, I used 0.15% IDY

Offline foreplease

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Re: Is it safe to put dough back on the fridge?
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2019, 10:25:53 PM »
Yea, it will be fine. Good luck.
-Tony

Offline Gene in Acadiana

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Re: Is it safe to put dough back on the fridge?
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2019, 01:00:35 AM »
I've done this many times and never had a problem. I'll occasionally have an extra dough ball warming up to room temperature in case of a mishap and if I end up not using it, it goes back into the fridge for the next batch of pizzas in a day or two. 

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Is it safe to put dough back on the fridge?
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2019, 06:15:13 PM »
Depending upon the dough formulation it may or may not survive. Don't worry, it'll be safe to eat but it may not turn out as well as you hope. Just putting the dough back into the fridge will not quickly stop the fermentation process, it may continue for days in some home refrigerators. What to do? What to do? On the morning that you plan to make pizza later in the day re-ball the dough. Don't try to ball it tight, just get it into a ball shape, lightly oil it and place it back into the fermentation container. Pull the dough out of the fridge about 3-hours before plan to open it into a skin.
Some issues you may face:
1) The yeast ran out of nutrient and began cannibalizing itself resulting in a wet, sticky dough with little oven spring.
2) The dough has become excessively acidic making the pizza difficult to bake properly.
3) The yeast has consumed all of the sugar normally used for crust color development  making the pizza difficult to bake properly.
4) The dough becomes over fermented with all of the good things associated with an over fermented dough such as a dough that feels like putty, difficult to open without tearing, sticky, lacking oven spring, etc.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline maijimenez

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Re: Is it safe to put dough back on the fridge?
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2019, 08:37:51 PM »
Thanks so much guys!

Depending upon the dough formulation it may or may not survive. Don't worry, it'll be safe to eat but it may not turn out as well as you hope. Just putting the dough back into the fridge will not quickly stop the fermentation process, it may continue for days in some home refrigerators. What to do? What to do? On the morning that you plan to make pizza later in the day re-ball the dough. Don't try to ball it tight, just get it into a ball shape, lightly oil it and place it back into the fermentation container. Pull the dough out of the fridge about 3-hours before plan to open it into a skin.
Some issues you may face:
1) The yeast ran out of nutrient and began cannibalizing itself resulting in a wet, sticky dough with little oven spring.
2) The dough has become excessively acidic making the pizza difficult to bake properly.
3) The yeast has consumed all of the sugar normally used for crust color development  making the pizza difficult to bake properly.
4) The dough becomes over fermented with all of the good things associated with an over fermented dough such as a dough that feels like putty, difficult to open without tearing, sticky, lacking oven spring, etc.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Sure are a lot of issues to consider, thanks a lot Tom, big help as always!

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