A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached  (Read 555 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline apizza

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 794
  • Location: Wethersfield, CT
  • I Love Pizza!
Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« on: December 15, 2019, 12:10:46 PM »
I was a little surprised to see this type of article in my local Sunday paper opinion section. It's not political. How'd that happen. Appears to be written by a local who comes out strong for unbleached flour. Hope they let you see it for no charge.
https://www.courant.com/opinion/op-ed/hc-op-leshane-bleached-flour-1215-20191215-2irtavf4mrbvviusfltpyazeem-story.html
Marty

Offline foreplease

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 6675
  • Age: 60
  • Location: St. Joseph, MI
Re: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2019, 03:04:11 PM »
That was a good read. Itís always been UBAP for me. Bread flour Iím not sure about but I will look more closely at the label now.
-Tony

Online The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 6619
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2019, 05:12:57 PM »
It would read better if he/she knew what the hXll he/she was talking about!
1) Need to study up on why bleached flour became popular in the U.S.
2) KBRO3 is indeed a known carcinogen but but it is converted to bromide (which is safe) during the baking process and KBRO3 was never detected, then in the 1970's the Japanese perfected a test procedure that could detect KBRO3 in ppb (parts per billion) not ppm (parts per million) as previous tests could detect. They found trace amounts (ppb) of residual KBRO3 and it was immediately banned in many countries. Today the legal limit for KBRO3 is 15-ppm at which level residual even at ppb cannot be detected.....argument: "but that doesn't mean it isn't there". By that logic I guess we should stop eating eggs and ground meat since both are assumed to be E-coli positive (now you know why you should not eat raw/under cooked hamburger or eggs, yes that includes cake and cookie batter too (no more licking the bowl). But wait, doesn't cooking kill the bacteria? Yes it does, but does it kill 100% of it? You won't know for sure unless you test what you are about to eat, so lets just avoid eating ground meat and eggs as well as anything made with them. This seems absurd to me, in view of what is in our drinking water, in the pure city air which we breathe, in the city swimming pool (speak of chlorine), how about the mercury in the ocean fish that we eat? It just goes on and on and on, I for one, decided a long time ago to cut my losses and stop worrying about the foods that I eat, I believe in redeeming social value, by this I mean I select foods that are known to be more nutritious such as whole wheat breads/flours, etc. and I really don't care much about the "additives" in them, I eat potatoes but always order with the skin on if possible, I never peel an apple (not even when making apple pie), I drink juices with the pulp (fiber is good for us). Worrying about too many things will give you high blood pressure or an ulcer and in my world those are also dangerous and should be avoided too.
Eat and drink in moderation and be merry!
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
As for being banned in Europe, true, it is, but then so is aluminum as it pertains to any kind of food. Why? Because a researcher found aluminum in the brains of persons who had died with Dementia so aluminum (yes pots and pans too) were immediately banned. We've all seen pock marked aluminum pots and pans, now you know where all that aluminum went! False! It doesn't quite work that way, and the aluminum found in the brain matter was discovered to be normal

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 15131
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2019, 05:57:02 PM »
You always continue to impress me Tom... You're such a learned fellow.... We were lucky to have you still posting here.
Thanks dude!  🍕😎
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TXCraig1

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 27429
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Pizza is not bread.
    • Craig's Neapolitan Garage
Re: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2019, 08:13:18 AM »
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline HansB

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5047
  • Location: Detroit, MI
    • 500px
Re: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2019, 08:49:06 AM »
You always continue to impress me Tom... You're such a learned fellow.... We w̶e̶r̶e̶ are lucky to have you still posting here.
Thanks dude!  🍕😎

:)
Hans

Online The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 6619
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Local opinion piece, bleached vs unbleached
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2019, 12:09:28 AM »
I was in charge of the Experimental Baking Group at AIB when the bromate thing hit the fan and we all had a good idea of what was to follow so we embarked on a rather lengthy study both in-house and through collaboration with the baking and allied industries to find an acceptable substitute for potassium bromate. The study continued for several years and during that time we all learned a lot about how different dough strengtheners work both by themselves and when used in combination with other dough strengtheners. Today we (the baking industry) have some excellent oxidative enzyme type dough strengtheners to work with as a replacement for potassium bromate but for the most part they are only used in very specific applications such as frozen dough and some specialty breads and are not generally in wide use for a couple of reasons such as:
1) We found that bromate really wasn't needed except in continuous mix bread aka batter whipped bread (common in the 50's and 60's), instead it was being used as a crutch to help maintain product quality with less than stellar performing flours available at the time.
2) Wheat breeders were developing new and stronger wheat varieties for the then popular continuous mix bread processes BUT as continuous mix bread fell from popularity (rightfully so) by the early to mid 70's the baking industry had flour being supplied to it by the millers that was too strong for the bread making process which replaced continuous mix bread, the sponge and dough bread making process. In some bakery plants they used a flour brew process where 30 to 40% of the flour was fermented in the liquid brew (think biga), in this case the new flour created even more issues as the brew flour could not be increased above 40% due to gluten separation so the finished breads were always showing signs of excessive strength (too much volume/height and wild break and shred) were critical issues as the faults interfered with high speed bagging of the bread.
3) Issue #2 above was of the highest critical nature to the baking industry at the time (we also worked on that too as we began researching ingredients known as "reducing agents") which included things like L-cysteine, glutathione aka dead yeast, various vegetable powders (onion and garlic), potassium sorbate and a few others). With #3 resolved, the baking industry seemed to settle down and began making decent bread once again and with the stronger flours available they soon learned that bromate really wasn't all that necessary so when the bromate replacers became available they were pretty well met with a yawn except for a few specialized applications like the frozen dough previously mentioned.
4) Due to the growing consumer concerns over the use of bromate most bakeries readily deleted bromate from their dough formulas with no ill affects to finished product quality.

Today flour can still be had that is bromated but there are strict Federal guidelines limiting how much bromate (in total) can be used. For the most part we can buy flour in 50# bags that is either bromated or non-bromated, your choice. As a side note, Interstate Brands Corporation Bakeries began producing a white pan bread which they called "Grandma's Bread" this bread was unique for the time in that it was made with a non-bleached flour, this means the flour had a natural creamy/yellowish color and the finished bread had a corresponding yellowish crumb color, they opened the gap on their sheeting rolls at the moulder for a slightly more open crumb structure and a whole new direction was created for white pan bread, that was one of "old fashion", like grandma used to make. From that point on most flour being shipped to bakeries was now un-bleached. This still exists to this day.
It's really fun and interesting to see all of this unfold especially when you're in the thick of it and in some way you realize that history is being made before your very eyes and you're a part of it.
How sad to see AIB go the way of the DODO BIRD as no one will will ever be able to have such great exposure in the future.
That's our trivia lesson for the day.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T