A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Considerations when adding chia, flax, other seeds to dough?  (Read 240 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Dippenwood

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Considerations when adding chia, flax, other seeds to dough?
« on: December 16, 2019, 04:01:36 PM »
I want to up the heart healthy specs on my breads, so Iím looking at adding ground chia, flax, maybe sunflower seeds, etc. to a higher hydration white and whole wheat sourdough loaf. I want the breads to have enough of these seeds to make a difference from a health standpoint, but I donít know how much these non-flour (and non-gluten) elements might affect results, structure, rise, and all the other aspects of the final product. Sure, Iíve tossed in a nominal amount of cracked flax seed to doughs before for the visuals, but this time Iíd like the seed component to bring some real nutritional heft. I donít mind experimenting of course, but I thought Iíd see what the brain trust here might already know. Iím planning to start with a 50/50 (ish) white and whole wheat flour mix, around 70% hydration with a 24 hour ish ferment. Iíd like to find the maxed out cracked or ground seed component that doesnít jeopardize structure, rise and all the other good bread characteristics a good loaf shoots for. Thoughts. Thanks in advance.

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 5964
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Considerations when adding chia, flax, other seeds to dough?
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2019, 12:39:48 AM »
For bread you are going to have a tough time with a 50/50 mix, I suggest starting with a 65/35 blend (35% being the seeds). You will need to pre-hydrate the seeds prior to addition to the dough. If you will go beck into the archives you will find where I've provided instructions on how to find the optimum absorption for the multi-grain blend of a multi-grain dough. It's important to get this right as it will have a huge impact upon the finished bread quality as well as the quantity of seed that can ultimately be incorporated into your dough. Remember to develop your seed blend first, then do the absorption determination, if you change the seed blend composition the absorption will change and you will need to find the absorption of the new blend.
You will also want to keep your total dough fermentation time on the short side (6-hours?) and is adding a sour don't get too heavy handed as both fermentation and the sourdough starter will weaken the dough making it more difficult to carry the seeds without collapse.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline QwertyJuan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 513
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Considerations when adding chia, flax, other seeds to dough?
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2019, 10:23:35 PM »
Crazy question Tom... but I use oatmeal in a molasses brown bread I make here at work... I found that by using bread flour instead of AP flour that I get better results with the oatmeal. Is it because the bread flour is stronger and sorta "makes up" for the weakened dough?? Maybe it's all in my head, but the stronger flour seems to help. Or is it just me?? :D

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 5964
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Considerations when adding chia, flax, other seeds to dough?
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2019, 12:22:48 AM »
No, it's not just in your head. You are spot-on. Anytime non-gluten forming flours are added we always use a sufficiently strong flour to make up for the dilution of the gluten by the non gluten forming flour(s).
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T