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Author Topic: Pizza aerobics  (Read 420 times)

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Offline Michiel

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Pizza aerobics
« on: December 23, 2019, 02:55:22 AM »
Hi,

Recently I saw this video of the man twirling and shaking his pizza dough:


How do you get dough that is this strong?
I read somewhere that you need to mix your dough very long to make gluten stronger.
Is this true?
What are the other factors?

Thanks.

Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Pizza aerobics
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2019, 10:32:47 AM »
I'm not good at searching but I remember Tom answering this question before. It was basically tons of salt and no yeast. I don't think you need to mix it any longer per se because the salt strengthens the dough. I am pretty sure Tom says its completely inedible because its like 10% salt or something. Either Tom or Peter (who is the search god) will answer a bit better than I did. :)

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza aerobics
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2019, 01:10:30 PM »
However, if you are asking about how the factors involved in making dough for consumption which can be tossed as seen in the video, the factors are:
2 to 2.5% salt.
Flour with a high protein content.
Optimum dough absorption, NOT MAXIMUM, probably in the 58 to 60% range.
Optimum dough fermentation for the yeast level employed.
It is interesting to note that in the video we see the dough balls being partially opened using a pastry pin prior to hand tossing, this is important as it provides a more uniform thickness dough skin, without thin spots, which makes it MUCH easier to toss without tearing. You have heard me advocate this many times for those who might be "toss challenged".
The real key here is to mix the dough just until it develops a smooth appearance and then allow biochemical gluten development to develop the gluten for you. This results in a strong and extensible gluten structure as opposed to mixing which develops a more elastic gluten structure.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Buck47

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Re: Pizza aerobics
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2019, 01:11:48 PM »
This may be helpful

  How to toss a pizza, table work, and the whip

   How to make Trick Pizza Dough
My family name can be traced back to the very earliest days of the "Federal Witness Protection Program."

Offline Michiel

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Re: Pizza aerobics
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2019, 03:23:45 AM »
Hi Tom,

First I want to say that I am very honoured for your help. As from others too on this forum.

What do you mean with optimum dough fermentation? Is this 150-170% of the volume of the dough?

You talk about a pastry pin but if you look at 1:10 you see him taking the dough out of the box and not using it at all and still tossing. Same goes for 2:25.
However, I'll def take your word for it and try it at home by myself with first a pastry pin and then hand tossing.
Twirling around the fingers is something that I have never tried but will.

Thanks for everybodies response.
Didn't knew that the dough aerobics used a lot of salt and no yeast, so that's nice to know!!  8)

However, if you are asking about how the factors involved in making dough for consumption which can be tossed as seen in the video, the factors are:
2 to 2.5% salt.
Flour with a high protein content.
Optimum dough absorption, NOT MAXIMUM, probably in the 58 to 60% range.
Optimum dough fermentation for the yeast level employed.
It is interesting to note that in the video we see the dough balls being partially opened using a pastry pin prior to hand tossing, this is important as it provides a more uniform thickness dough skin, without thin spots, which makes it MUCH easier to toss without tearing. You have heard me advocate this many times for those who might be "toss challenged".
The real key here is to mix the dough just until it develops a smooth appearance and then allow biochemical gluten development to develop the gluten for you. This results in a strong and extensible gluten structure as opposed to mixing which develops a more elastic gluten structure.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Pizza aerobics
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2019, 11:46:28 AM »
Optimum dough fermentation for a straight dough is best defined as first full rise + 25% of first full rise time. However since the straight dough procedure is seldom used when making pizza and instead a hybrid procedure is more commonly used employing different fermentation conditions there is no hard and fast rule for determining optimum fermentation, the best definition I can give you is optimum fermentation is that fermentation time which provides the best overall dough handling properties at the time of opening the dough balls into skins by whatever method you opt to use. Forget bread dough technology, it doesn't apply to pizza dough. The only real way to determine optimum fermentation is through experimenting under CONTROLLED conditions, this means that you will need to strive to maintain those factors which affect the fermentation rate as a constant, think finished dough temperature, dough absorption, type, amount and freshness of the yeast, room temperature, refrigeration temperature, internal dough ball temperature at the time of opening (50 to 60F). In other words, Effective Dough Management.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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