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Author Topic: Humidity in oven.  (Read 328 times)

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Offline nick57

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Humidity in oven.
« on: December 25, 2019, 08:35:51 PM »
  After hearing what you have to say and others on the forum, I have changed my mine on electric ovens. I have been pretty lucky in producing good pizza. Unfortunately my home was built in the late 70's in a total electric community. To make matters worse the contractor used aluminum wiring. I check all the outlets on a yearly basis. Not sure if this has been thought of before or even if it will work. When placing the pie in the oven I pour water over a pan filled with lava rocks that have been heating in the oven. Would that be something that would help in the rise?

Online HansB

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Re: Humidity in oven.
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2019, 10:15:03 PM »
Using water and lava rocks is very common for bread baking in home ovens. Looking forward to hearing from Doc on using it for pizza....
Hans

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Humidity in oven.
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2019, 12:10:58 PM »
Your idea is sound but your timing is off, instead of pouring the water when you place the pizza in the oven you should do it several minutes prior to placing the pizza in the oven. You should not be trying to flood the oven with steam as you would when making certain types of breads, instead you just want to add a little moisture/humidity to the oven. The amount of water added needs to be measured so it is all evaporated at about the same time the pizza is done baking. I'm not sure the use of lava rocks is the best idea either as it increases the surface area for evaporation which puts a lot of moisture in the oven all at once (this is called "flooding" the oven with steam, instead you want as little area for surface evaporation as possible. Think a 2" diameter piece of pipe, 6-inches long (automotive tailpipe comes to mind) with a flat piece of steel welded to one end so it will hold water and stand upright in the oven, experiment with the amount of water added to the pipe. The issue that you will need to work out is when you add the water to the pipe it will be very hot thus releasing steam rapidly into the oven (not what you are looking for). Maybe pour boiling water into the room temperature pipe and place it into the oven a minute or so prior to placing the pizza in the oven would work better? Like I said, this will be the challenge.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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