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Author Topic: DIY Dry Aged Beef  (Read 751 times)

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Offline Whisky

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DIY Dry Aged Beef
« on: December 27, 2019, 10:51:45 AM »
Got a 14.85lb choice boneless rib loin aging in Umai Dry bags. My first time going through this process. My question is, what is the best duration to age for the happy medium between taste/tenderness and losing more of your product to evaporation/trimming? I imagine at some point there is diminishing returns. Anybody have any knowledge on this?

Thanks

Offline Mmmph

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Offline Whisky

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2019, 11:53:17 AM »
http://blog.golbsalt.com/2012/09/07/umai-dry-bag-is-it-really-dry-aging/

Quote
2) Any process that does not allow for ‘natural enzymatic and biochemical processes’ also does not qualify. The primary aspect of dry aging is not simply the evaporation of moisture from the surface of the beef as the creators of the UMAi product would have you believe. The primary aspect is the allowance of circulated air, technically oxygen, which assists with the aerobic biochemical process.

3) Autoxidation of oleate (the fatty acid found in beef muscle) is one of the primary biochemical processes that occurs during aging. This breakdown of oleate is responsible for the resulting volatile compounds found in beef whether dry or wet aged. The primary compound is heptane. Of particular note is the fact that significantly more heptane is found in dry aged beef than wet aged. The reason? Oxygen.
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The real issue with the UMAi Dry Bag, is that it doesn’t let oxygen in and that’s an epic fail! In fact, the UMAi Dry Bag requires that you use a vacuum sealed bag similar to a Foodsaver bag to get all the air out.  You cannot claim to be dry aging your beef when using one of these bags.

The truth is, the UMAi Dry Bag is just another form of wet aging. Yes, we understand that the moisture from the beef gets out and that results in an intensification of flavor - probably even an improvement in flavor over typical wet aging. However, without the ‘natural enzymatic and biochemical process that occurs because OXYGEN can get to the meat, you don’t have a dry aging process.

I don't know, but that seems kind of sketchy to me for a couple reasons.

1) I tend to doubt that oxygen can migrate much past the surface of the meat, so I question how much aerobic activity is happening from oxygen coming from the atmosphere at any meaningful depth in the meat. Maybe the activity at the surface is all that matters, but even that will slow/stop as it dries over time.

2) O2 and H20 molecules are very similar in size. 0.292nm and 0.275nm respectively. N2, the main component of the atmosphere is much larger at 0.420nm. It's entirely possible that the bags let H20 out and 02 in while blocking N2 and thus keeping the bag from inflating.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2019, 11:54:52 AM by TXCraig1 »
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Offline megan45

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2019, 12:19:00 PM »
http://blog.golbsalt.com/2012/09/07/umai-dry-bag-is-it-really-dry-aging/

Gee ... a company that sells it's own "dry aging" kits dissing a competitor product ... now THERE's a reliable source.

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Offline Jackitup

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2019, 03:03:22 PM »
If you are going to do it, best to do it in a dedicated fridge that is NOT opened several times a day for other stuff! True dry aging is done in a temperature AND humidity controlled environment.
Jon

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If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline Whisky

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2019, 03:47:50 PM »
I would have thought the same thing and had a spot cleared out in my beer fridge. Then i read the directions and they highly suggested you use your regular fridge.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #7 on: December 27, 2019, 03:53:12 PM »
I would have thought the same thing and had a spot cleared out in my beer fridge. Then i read the directions and they highly suggested you use your regular fridge.

Hmmmmm.........?
Jon

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If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline Whisky

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #8 on: December 27, 2019, 04:05:21 PM »
Hmmmmm.........?

Quote
Tips for successful dry aging
with UMAi Dry • Take time to get familiar with the flexible,
single layer UMAi Dry material.
• Dry age only whole muscle subprimal cuts;
never individual steaks.
• Do not make cuts or folds in the meat prior to
aging. Also, do not season the meat.
• Leave fat cap on and trim only after aging.
• The moist protein coating on the surface of
the meat is essential. Do not wash or wipe.
• A "vacuum" is less essential than the "bond"
that forms in the first 5–7 days. Small
pockets of air in the corners or the divots in
the meat do not pose a problem. You only
need a 75 to 80% surface bond.
• Place the UMAi Dry-sealed beef on a wire
rack to ensure airflow on all sides.
• Use a home refrigerator that you use to store
food (Old garage fridges and dorm fridges
lack air circulation and dehumidification for
successful dry aging).

Quote
• Use ANY modern frost free refrigerator or walk-in with good
temperature control and air flow--opening and closing the fridge
enables the refrigeration cycle to stir up the air and temperature--a
good thing for dry aging.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #9 on: December 27, 2019, 04:12:42 PM »


I guess they would know best on how to optimize their particular product! Weigh it at the start and at the end of it's aging journey, I would be interested in the weight loss and your opinion on the final taste results!
« Last Edit: December 27, 2019, 11:32:04 PM by Jackitup »
Jon

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If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

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Offline corkd

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2019, 05:23:18 PM »
I don’t know- I’m eying that block of velveeta! Nachos!

Offline nick57

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2019, 09:43:18 PM »
I don’t know- I’m eying that block of velveeta! Nachos!

 You will be helping the country by lessoning the amount of government cheese they need to get rid of. Rotel cheese dip is addictive.

Offline scott r

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2019, 09:56:06 PM »
Now that I have kids I am exposed to lots of people looking for quick easy ways to feed their families on a regular basis.    A neighbor a few years ago browned some ground beef, tossed in a bunch of velveta which melted down with the meat juices, and then wrapped the whole thing in refrigerator biscuit pizza dough from a can and baked it. These were "cheeseburger calzones".  Let me tell you.... I couldn't stop eating that one!  Really low brow, but I don't care lol...flavor is flavor.    Of course pickled jalapenos, caramelized onions or bacon would go great in there as well, maybe with some diced fresh tomatoes just before the oven bake...   Never could bring myself to bust this one out at home myself but I won't forget it. 

Offline bregent

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2019, 05:27:03 PM »
Bummer, dude!

That blog gets re-posted on various sites frequently. I think the author understands the dry aging process, but does not have any direct experience with Umai and didn't take the time to understand how the bags work. They assumed they are vacuum bags - they are not.  I forget the pore size, but it's more than large enough to allow the transfer of oxygen. The pore size is small enough to allow a vacuum sealer to pull a strong enough vacuum to get the bag to form around the meat, but it does not prevent the transfer of oxygen. I've used them to dry age beef, and make charcuterie.  They work very well for those of us that don't have a dedicated drying chamber. 
Bob

Offline Whisky

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2020, 12:57:28 PM »
Pics from day 10 and day 22

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Offline TravisNTexas

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2020, 03:17:07 PM »
Pics from day 10 and day 22

Well, it's certainly lookiing good!!
Cheers,
Travis

Offline Jackitup

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #16 on: January 16, 2020, 03:23:23 PM »
Pics from day 10 and day 22

Any weight loss?
Jon

“The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.”            -Mark Twain

If you don't think you're getting what you should out of life.....maybe you're getting what you deserve       -the Root Beer Lady

Offline Whisky

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #17 on: January 16, 2020, 03:36:33 PM »
Any weight loss?
I would be surprised if there wasnt, but I haven't weighed it yet. I will next time i pull it out.

Offline Dangerous Salumi

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #18 on: January 16, 2020, 04:12:49 PM »
I dry age our Christmas and Easter bone-in Rib Roasts in a basement refrigerator. I have done it now for several years.  The last one I did was a little over 45 days and that was the best so far. It was the most tender and had the best flavor, that I can remember, out of all of them. I does loose some weight due to drying and it does loose weight because of the trimming but if you look at the cost of dry aged beef at a speciality butcher (if you can find it) you are way ahead of the game.

A Dry Aged Prime rib 7 lbs (probably a 3 bone cut) is $370 at Lobel's
https://www.lobels.com/usda-prime-dry-aged-bone-in-rib-roasts-1053

7 Bone Prime Rib Roast (whole primal cut) 12-14 lbs $525 at Debragga's
https://www.debragga.com/prime-beef/dry-aged-prime-7-rib-roast.html

I dont use the bag pictured in the thread.
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Offline Whisky

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Re: DIY Dry Aged Beef
« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2020, 08:37:17 PM »
Saturday was day 45 and I had the time to process it, so I did.

I cooked a steak for supper. It was a 17oz end piece from the less marbled end of the loin. I had also left more of the darker bark on the exterior side as I had read that is where a lot of the flavor comes from. I didnt like the texture at all on that side, and i think it made the steak tough. On that particular steak i was very disappointed in tenderness.

Also, apparently dry aged meat cooks twice as quick as non aged. I was intending to smoke at 225 until IT 100ish and finish off on a hot grill. Well I caught the steak at 110, not expecting it to be that high, and tried to get a sear but it reached 120 really quick. I wanted a rare steak. I lightly tented in foil and carryover cooking must have kicked my butt again. You'd never guess I pulled this steak at 120. Also, there isnt much for juices on the plate due to the evaporation during aging process.

Overall flavor was ok, not as distinct as I was hoping for. The fat ,however, tasted phenomenal. My next steak is really gonna have to wow me for me to believe this is worth the hassle.

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