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Author Topic: Different Stages of a Par Baked Crust  (Read 560 times)

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Offline PizzaManic

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Different Stages of a Par Baked Crust
« on: January 06, 2020, 09:58:50 AM »
Dear Tom
I hope you are well and God Bless you for the year ahead  :)

I have a question regarding Par Baked Crust - I'm particularly interested in Cracker Style Crusts but I'm also curious to know if other styles would defer?

My question is what is the shelf life of a Par Baked Crust in the different stages below?

Room Temperature
Fridge
Frozen

With regards to the Frozen State, should it be thawed first or baked directly from Frozen?

Thanks again for all you assistance
Mo
Regards Mo

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Different Stages of a Par Baked Crust
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2020, 08:32:51 AM »
Hi Dough Doctor

Furthermore to my initial question, I came across some advise you gave in the past to use a product which will retain moisture in the par baked crust if I'm not mistaken.

I can't seem to find the post again so can't remember what the product is, but wondering will it have any benefit on a Cracker Style Par Baked crust since the hydration is already low?

Thanks
Regards Mo

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Different Stages of a Par Baked Crust
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2020, 10:30:19 AM »
Mo;
The shelf life of par-baked pizza crusts stored at ambient room temperature (70 to 85F) will depend to some extent upon the method by which it was made (the dough that is). A crust that was made from a dough that was cold fermented for 24 to 48-hours will typically have a shelf life of about 4-days before mold rears its ugly head, if the fermentation period is more along the lines of 5-days you can add another 12 to 24-hours to this but if it was made using a sourdough method where the pH of the finished crust is down around 4.2 or lower you might get an additional 2 to 3-days (possibly more). With refrigerated storage (34 to 38F) it's entirely possible to double these numbers and with frozen storage mold is no longer the issue, instead we are now concerned over things such as oxidative rancidity, freezer burn (a MAJOR issue in home freezers with automatic defrost cycles), with frozen storage periods of more than 45-days there can also be oxidative flavor changes which can render the crust bland/tasteless, even when reheated. In most home freezers with auto defrost we see moisture migration from the crust (freezer burn) within the first two to 3-weeks with it becoming progressively worse as time progresses. By the time the crust has been in the freezer for 60-days or less it is so bad that the crust warps and checks or cracks, because of these potential issues with frozen storage we don't recommend storing crusts or other yeast leavened baked foods for that matter, more than 3 to 4-weeks.
Note:
With the above cited mold issues the appearance of mold will also be influenced by the level of inoculation/amount of exposure to mold.
The issues related to frozen storage are largely related to the crust temperature at time of freezing, the rate at which the crust is frozen and the characteristics of the packaging material used to package the crusts in. Commercial manufacturers also use a gas flush packaging to address the oxidative issues.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline PizzaManic

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Re: Different Stages of a Par Baked Crust
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2020, 10:42:57 AM »
DD,

Is Gas Flush Packaging similar to Vacuum Sealing?

If I am refrigerating, what's the best way to package the Par Baked Crust?

Thanks always for your superb guidance.

Mo
Regards Mo

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Different Stages of a Par Baked Crust
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2020, 11:47:08 AM »
No, DO NOT EVER vacuum package pizza crusts or tortillas! Both are prone to clostridium which can be (usually is) deadly. There is a track record for clostridium growth in tortillas (two cases that I'm aware of) out of Canada. Gas flush packaging uses either carbon dioxide or nitrogen with about 0.5% oxygen to prevent growth of clostridium. The material you are thinking of is a marine colloid such as Xanthan or Carageenan gum for increasing moisture retention in baked products. Balchem is a company specializing in these ingredients and they have a product that they call Ticaloid Lite which I've personally used in this application and it works very well.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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