A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Cinnamon rolls  (Read 735 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline delivery.boy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 19
  • Location: Anywhere
  • I Love Pizza!
Cinnamon rolls
« on: January 07, 2020, 05:31:05 PM »
I'm not sure if posting here is wrong or not (mod pls move it for me if it's not the right place). I found this cinnamon rolls recipe by Dough Doctor on PMQ and I have a question.

A great cinnamon dough formula is as follows:
Flour (regular pizza flour) 100%
Salt: 1.5%
Sugar: 20%
Butter/Margarine or Butter Flavored Crisco: 15%
IDY Yeast: 4%
Whole eggs: 10%
Water: 45%
Procedure:
Hold 1/2 of both the sugar and fat out of the dough until it has mixed to the point where it is becoming smooth in appearance, then add the remaining sugar and fat and continue mixing until well incorporated. Remove the dough from the mixer and form into balls weighing about 5# each. Place each ball onto a lightly oiled sheet pan, cover with plastic and allow to ferment in the cooler overnight. On the following day, remove the cold dough from the sheet pan and place onto a floured surface, roll out into a rectangular shaped piece about 3/16-inch in thickness, brush with melted butter, leaving the bottom 2-inches of the dough without any butter. Brush this portion of the dough with water. Sprinkle brown sugar and cinnamon (be liberal with the cinnamon) over the surface of the dough but do not cover that bottom edge that has the water on it. Begin rolling the dough (like a jelly roll) from the top down. The portion with the water will serve to seal the roll, keeping it from unwinding during baking. Even out the curled dough so it is all the same diameter for its entire length, now using a French Knife, or metal blade bench scraper, cut the dough into 1-inch thick pieces for cinnamon rolls, place into greased cake pans or sheet pans (do not pack them in, instead, leave a little space between each dough piece), set aside to proof (raise) until the dough is slightly above the top edge of the pan, brush or spray with whole milk and bake at 375 to 400F until lightly browned. Allow to cool for 5-minutes and apply a powdered sugar-water icing, serve.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

So this cinnamon rolls dough required cold fermenting as other pizza doughs? As I noticed on the other pizza dough recipe Dr. Lehmann always including the ' desired finish dough temperature'. What about this recipe, as it required cold fermenting so the finished dough temperature must be important, am I right? Sorry I know this is an amateur question but all I do is just following your recipes step by step and I don't even know when the dough is 'ready' or 'good enough' just by my eyes. And if you have time please explain for me why the finished dough temperature should be looked at, and is there any other methods to know when the dough is ready after mixing (not just by looking at it). Sorry for my bad English.

P/s: I have a Hobart electric mixer, which speed should I go with?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2020, 06:05:34 PM by delivery.boy »

Offline QwertyJuan

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 652
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Cinnamon rolls
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2020, 08:16:37 PM »
I doubt it will matter a whole lot TBH, unless it's really hot. You're only putting it in the fridge overnight. On the other hand, if you want to keep it consistent, as you would in a place of business, you're going to want to target the same finished dough temp each time.

I'm sure Tom will chime in as soon as he can. He IS the man!!  :D

Offline delivery.boy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 19
  • Location: Anywhere
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Cinnamon rolls
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2020, 12:11:34 AM »
I doubt it will matter a whole lot TBH, unless it's really hot. You're only putting it in the fridge overnight. On the other hand, if you want to keep it consistent, as you would in a place of business, you're going to want to target the same finished dough temp each time.

I'm sure Tom will chime in as soon as he can. He IS the man!!  :D

Thank you. Not really a business but I want to do it in a large scale. So I really want the consistency

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 6619
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Cinnamon rolls
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2020, 01:06:39 AM »
For cinnamon rolls we want a sweet tasting roll not necessarily a well fermented flavor so for this reason I normally like to target a finished dough temperature between 70 and 75F/21.1 and 23.9C, in some cases I will target a finished dough temperature of 80F/26.7C and ferment the dough at room temperature for only 2 to 3-hours before using it to make my cinnamon rolls.
The reason why I am A.R. on temperature is because it is the temperature of the dough that drives fermentation and as I've always said "Without temperature control you cannot have effective dough management" Without effective dough management you cannot have consistency from one dough to the next.
By far, the best way to judge a pizza dough to determine if it has been sufficient mixed is by its appearance. If you stop your mixer after each minute of mixing you will be able to see the dough progressively becoming smoother. As soon as the dough has taken on a smooth (not lumpy) appearance, it has be sufficiently mixed. With just a little time you will be able to look at the dough as it is mixing and see it take on the desired smoothness, once you see that, you're done mixing. As a rule, with pizza doughs as well as pastry doughs it is better to error on the under mixed side of the equation than to over mix the dough. The reason for under mixing a pastry dough is because it will receive significant gluten development during the following rolling and/or folding/forming procedures.
It is impossible to answer your question regarding your mixer as all mixers are different but suffice it to say that low speed should only be used to combine the ingredients together prior to mixing the dough at a higher speed where gluten development will actually take place, with most home type mixers I'm guessing that this will be either speed #2 or #3 but in the end it will be the highest speed at which the mixer will mix the dough without showing strain or overheating the motor.
If you don't have a spiral design dough arm on your mixer you will most likely need to periodically stop the mixer to pull the dough down off of the top of the "C" hook aka "J" hook. If your mixer has a spiral design dough arm you will not need to do this as the design of the arm pushes the dough down to the bottom of the bowl rather than allowing it to climb up the hook.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline delivery.boy

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 19
  • Location: Anywhere
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Cinnamon rolls
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2020, 04:49:51 AM »
Thank you for your reply Mr. Tom. I'll try test a batch tomorrow. Before that I still have a question: To archive that target finished dough temperature. I guess we'll have to control the temperature of the ingredients too? To get the melted butter, I always take the butter from the freezer then put it in the microwave. But in this case the melted butter maybe'll be too hot, cause the finished dough hotter too -> overfermented. So the solution is I melt the butter first then put in in the refrigerator before mixing, am I right? I live in a tropical place without proper temperature controllers like AC, so I guess it'll be hard to archive a finished dough temperature in '79-75F' range

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
  • Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 6619
  • Location: Manhattan, KS
    • Dough Doctor
Re: Cinnamon rolls
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2020, 08:10:03 AM »
Rather than using "melted" butter, just use "softened" butter, putting melted butter in the fridge is counter productive. As for achieving the targeted finished dough temperature just use colder water, some use water that has been stored in the fridge overnight while others find that they need to use a little crushed ice in the water too. I don't know how else to explain the appearance of the dough when it has been properly mixed except to say that it is just mixed until the dough has a smooth appearance which is a very good visual indicator that the dough has been sufficiently mixed when you are going to use 18 to 24-hours of cold fermentation. It is impossible for me to speculate what speed to mix the dough at using your specific mixer except to say that you should use the highest speed possible without fear of over working your mixer.
Tom Lehmann/the Dough Doctor

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress