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Author Topic: Bonci New Orleans  (Read 322 times)

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Offline Gene in Acadiana

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Bonci New Orleans
« on: March 11, 2020, 04:40:13 PM »
I was in New Orleans for a quick day-trip last weekend and made it a point to try the relatively new pizzeria opened by famed Roman-style guru Gabriele Bonci. It's located in the Central Business District on Julia so parking is not a problem like in the Quarter. In late afternoon on a Saturday, business was steady but not at all crowded.

I didn't have much time so I ordered slices of three styles to sample: a basic cheese with red sauce, potato mozzarella, and lemon ricotta. All were very good but the lemon ricotta was excellent. Besides the toppings which put it over the top, the lemon ricotta had a crust that really exemplified Roman style - very light and airy with a solid crunch on the bottom. The crust on the other two slices varied from too thin to too crispy. They were good, but not great because of that. So I was a little disappointed in the lack of consistency in the crust from pizza to pizza. But this place hasn't been open that long - so maybe they'll work it all out.

There's been a lot of discussion here and elsewhere about what type of flour Bonci uses, so below is a bag of what they are using in his U.S. locations, which is apparently milled specifically for him. Whether this is the same marino burrato flour that he reportedly has been using since the beginning I'm not sure, but maybe the details on the bag will be a clue to someone more familiar.

The pizza is not cheap, but you can't argue with the quality of ingredients. You pay by the pound after they cut off the amount you want and weigh it. Most styles are between $9.99 and $15.99 per pound. The slices below (with a beer) came to $15, which was not too bad for good pizza. The place is very European right down to the payment - there's no tipping and apparently employees are paid adequately without having to rely on tips to survive. I wish more restaurants would go this route, especially in places like these where it's counter service. Credit cards only, no cash accepted.

I was also very happy to see that Bonci did not pander at all to his US customers and all the pizza variations are authentically Roman. Being in New Orleans, the temptation is there to throw crawfish, boudin, andouille, oysters, etc. on anything and everything.  We get enough of that everywhere else.   

Offline jsaras

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Re: Bonci New Orleans
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2020, 05:22:14 PM »
That looks fairly consistent with both of his pizzerias in Rome. Interestingly, it's not nearly as thick as I thought it was going to be and it doesn't have the dramatic crumb structure that have become commonplace on Instagram
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Offline Gene in Acadiana

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Re: Bonci New Orleans
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2020, 06:21:30 PM »
That looks fairly consistent with both of his pizzerias in Rome. Interestingly, it's not nearly as thick as I thought it was going to be and it doesn't have the dramatic crumb structure that have become commonplace on Instagram

Some pieces were as thick as I was expecting for classic Al Taglio style (like the lemon ricotta) but others were surprisingly thin. Some of the slices even varied in thickness from one end to the other, which was a little disappointing as I expected each piece to be uniformly thick like good Sicilian or Detroit style.

So from your experience, did the thicknesses also vary in the different slices when you had it in Rome?

Offline jsaras

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Re: Bonci New Orleans
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2020, 07:13:51 PM »
Some pieces were as thick as I was expecting for classic Al Taglio style (like the lemon ricotta) but others were surprisingly thin. Some of the slices even varied in thickness from one end to the other, which was a little disappointing as I expected each piece to be uniformly thick like good Sicilian or Detroit style.

So from your experience, did the thicknesses also vary in the different slices when you had it in Rome?

They were uniformly about the thickness of a Costco pizza, about 0.10 TF.  Interestingly, the folks at Da Michele in Florence referred to Bonci's dough as "cracker pizza".
« Last Edit: March 11, 2020, 07:15:56 PM by jsaras »
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Offline Gene in Acadiana

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Re: Bonci New Orleans
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2020, 07:29:38 PM »
They were uniformly about the thickness of a Costco pizza, about 0.10 TF.  Interestingly, the folks at Da Michele in Florence referred to Bonci's dough as "cracker pizza".

That was what I was expecting. Looks like they need a little quality control in New Orleans or more training.

That's interesting about Da Michele's reference. I would associate "cracker crust" with round Roman style, but certainly not al taglio. Maybe that's their way of dismissing it.

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Offline Yael

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Re: Bonci New Orleans
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2020, 10:13:10 AM »
Pivetti makes his flour?...
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