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Author Topic: SAF IDY  (Read 395 times)

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Offline HansB

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SAF IDY
« on: March 26, 2020, 06:48:26 AM »
Hello Tom,

With the current shortage of SAF Red I'd like to know how the SAF Gold, osmotolerant yeast performs in dough that does not use any sugar?

Thanks!
Hans

Offline Yael

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2020, 08:46:37 AM »
Hello Tom,

With the current shortage of SAF Red I'd like to know how the SAF Gold, osmotolerant yeast performs in dough that does not use any sugar?

Thanks!

Hans,

Before Tom gives you a better reply, I used both and never notice a difference! The gold one has ascorbic acid, but the amount must be so low that the difference seems to be indistinguishable (as long as you don't add 10% yeast to your dough I guess  :-D).
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline amolapizza

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2020, 08:48:42 AM »
Hans,

Before Tom gives you a better reply, I used both and never notice a difference! The gold one has ascorbic acid, but the amount must be so low that the difference seems to be indistinguishable (as long as you don't add 10% yeast to your dough I guess  :-D).

Flour can also contain ascorbic acid :)
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2020, 11:19:40 AM »
Hello Tom,

With the current shortage of SAF Red I'd like to know how the SAF Gold, osmotolerant yeast performs in dough that does not use any sugar?

Thanks!
Hans,

I'm sure that Tom will give you the full scoop but here is what SAF itself says about the SAF Gold:

https://lesaffreyeast.com/product/saf-instant-gold/

Peter

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2020, 11:45:52 AM »
Not all that well. It has a high tolerance to sugar but a VERY POOR tolerance to salt, so unless you are using 1% salt or less, I don't recommend it.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline Yael

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2020, 12:50:23 AM »
Not all that well. It has a high tolerance to sugar but a VERY POOR tolerance to salt, so unless you are using 1% salt or less, I don't recommend it.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,

I thought yeast-product's yeasts were all the same, the difference being in added ingredients (like ascorbic acid, glutathion...) depending of the desired product? And why would it have a good tolerance to sugar, but not salt? I would have assumed that the yeast was "reinforced" to take more...
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2020, 02:20:35 AM »
The ascorbic acid is added only to counter the softening effect of the glutathione (yes, some is released during the drying and rehydration process).
The specific strain of S.C. used in the SAF GOLD has a high tolerance for sugar, but remember, SAF/Lesaffre is a French company so it was developed specifically for the French baking industry where low salt levels are employed when high sugar levels are used, this is why we see such limited use of it here in the U.S. as we typically use both high sugar and salt levels at the same time.
By the way, there is also a GREEN LABEL SAF which was developed specifically for use in frozen dough systems. We looked at this one too and didn't fine there to be sufficient difference in performance over RED LABEL to justify its increased cost. Again, this is why we don't see it used more than we do. You might say that it's hard to improve upon something as good as SAF RED LABEL.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline HansB

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2020, 08:16:09 AM »
Before posting here I put the question to SAF on their website. I was surprised to get called by two reps from SAF yesterday. Usually, you never seem to hear back from companies. He stated that all of their yeast has ascorbic acid added in the mfg process although in very small quantities, 300mg/100g. He said that the Gold is made with a different strain than the Red and does not work well with dough that has low sugar. It's formulated to work with and needs sugar for proper fermentation. Using it in dough without sugar will give much lower fermentation and can result in "off flavors" like excessive acedic flavors from the LAB during the longer fermentation time required. He said salt levels used in baking would not adversely affect performance of the Gold yeast. He also said that the current shortage of yeast due to the excessive buying is due to the shipping slowdown at the Mexican border.
Hans

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2020, 09:31:55 AM »
As some of our members know (for example, see https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=39328.0), SAF also offers an IDY developed specifically for pizza dough:

https://www.lesaffre.com/slider/saf-pizza-en/

Also, for those who are interested, over the past five years or so I have tried to collect information on yeast products in one place, to make it easier for me to answer questions, or for members to do likewise for themselves. That information can be seen on the top part of the page at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=40212.msg401012#msg401012

The Lallemand articles are especially good in my opinion. Of course, anything by Tom is very good.

I am always open to adding more stuff to my compilations, and that applies to yeast also. So, members should feel free to refer me to articles or other information on yeast that might be considered for addition to the above thread.

Peter


Offline colebg

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2020, 05:08:32 PM »
Before posting here I put the question to SAF on their website. I was surprised to get called by two reps from SAF yesterday. Usually, you never seem to hear back from companies. He stated that all of their yeast has ascorbic acid added in the mfg process although in very small quantities, 300mg/100g. He said that the Gold is made with a different strain than the Red and does not work well with dough that has low sugar. It's formulated to work with and needs sugar for proper fermentation. Using it in dough without sugar will give much lower fermentation and can result in "off flavors" like excessive acedic flavors from the LAB during the longer fermentation time required. He said salt levels used in baking would not adversely affect performance of the Gold yeast. He also said that the current shortage of yeast due to the excessive buying is due to the shipping slowdown at the Mexican border.
Actually yeast I get at a nearby grocery store which is saf doesn't contain ascorbic acid but its not instant. Its this yeast https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00N70O8AI/?tag=pmak-20
 

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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: SAF IDY
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2020, 05:18:22 PM »
As the name indicates what you are looking at is ADY (active dry yeast). It is different in a number of ways from IDY but the main thing to remember is that when using ADY in must be hydrated and activated prior to use. Do this by putting the ADY into about 5 times its weight of 100F/38C water. Be sure to put the yeast into the water, not the other way around. The water that the yeast is hydrated/activated in should be considered as part of the total dough water. Stir the yeast to suspend it in the water. Allow the suspended yeast to set for about 10-minutes to activate, then stir and pour into the dough water in the mixing bowl, you are now ready to add the remainder of ingredients and begin the mixing sequence.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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