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Author Topic: Gas Oven Balcony Safety  (Read 913 times)

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Offline megan45

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Re: Gas Oven Balcony Safety
« Reply #20 on: August 09, 2020, 01:48:39 PM »
I know I'm old, but thinking back in the 50's and 60's, there were homes that were heated with propane, as well as propane stove, refrigerators, and hot water heaters, all powered by propane.
I'm sure some of you remember seeing houses, usually rural areas, that had the big monster propane tanks in the back yards. They weren't there for decoration.

Completely different animal.

Even in the '50s and '60s the NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) building and life safety code required above-ground LP tanks of < 250 gal water capacity to be sited no closer than 10' to a source of ignition and no closer than 3' from an exhaust or ventilation port or window; tank between 250-2000 gal water capacity required a minimum separation of 25' from the closest source of ignition. Also, per NFPA code, the plumbing for the appliances also had to be pressure tested annually by pressurizing the leg being tested to 20 psi (residential propane appliances typically operated in the 2-5 PSI range), close the shutoff valve for the line and monitor the pressure for 30 min. If the pressure dropped 1 Lb or more, the inspector locked the shutoff valve closed and you had to get the line repaired and retested successfully before it was unlocked. Ain't nobody coming close to passing that with portable LP tanks and flexible hose.

You also couldn't legally refill a tank if it didn't have a current certificate of inspection sticker, and propane suppliers were required to log the date of the refill, COI sticker number and it's expiration date. Suppliers could have their licenses suspend or revoked if they didn't.

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