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Author Topic: Focaccia Barese  (Read 923 times)

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Offline DoouBall

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Focaccia Barese
« on: August 23, 2020, 08:05:37 PM »
First time trying to make this. Based on the recipe from Vincenzoís Plate. I used 20% white whole wheat, 2% wheat germ and 4% Naturkraft dried sourdough.

https://www.vincenzosplate.com/recipe-items/focaccia-barese/

865g dough ball for a 30x40cm blue steel pan. Baked 15 mins at 450F. Absolutely delicious!
« Last Edit: August 23, 2020, 11:25:27 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2020, 11:34:08 PM »
Ooh I want this. I used to live two blocks from A wonderful deli in Hoboken NJ that made this (Losurdo Bros).

Thanks for sharing!

Offline Hanglow

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2020, 03:52:20 AM »
Looks great, although i always thought focaccia barese was a durum wheat focaccia

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2020, 11:58:10 AM »
Looks great, although i always thought focaccia barese was a durum wheat focaccia

I think you're right that the original recipe is using durum wheat flour

https://www.greatitalianfoodtrade.it/en/street-food/focaccia-barese#:~:text=Focaccia%20barese%2C%20or%20in%20dialect,%2C%20cherry%20tomatoes%2C%20and%20potatoes.

I used Caputo Nuvola Super mixed with 20% white whole wheat and some wheat germ and it was delicious. I'm thinking that with durum this product might end up denser and chewier so I'm not sure that's my thing. I once tried making Ciabatta with just 20% semola and it was really chewy. Have you tried making focaccia with durum and with regular flour? Which did you like better?

Alex
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline Hanglow

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2020, 12:59:49 PM »
I can recommend the recipe I put in the first post of this thread
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=63251.0

It uses potato, and was pretty soft as a result iirc.  When I was looking at recipes a lot used 50/50 normal flour and durum wheat flour



I think all my favourite foccaccia that I have made have had mashed potatoes in them
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 01:05:00 PM by Hanglow »

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Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2020, 01:07:26 PM »
I think all my favourite foccaccia that I have made have had mashed potatoes in them

This is on my list to try. I have a strong feeling this will be amazing.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 01:14:44 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2020, 01:07:28 PM »
First time trying to make this. Based on the recipe from Vincenzoís Plate. I used 20% white whole wheat, 2% wheat germ and 4% Naturkraft dried sourdough.

https://www.vincenzosplate.com/recipe-items/focaccia-barese/

865g dough ball for a 30x40cm blue steel pan. Baked 15 mins at 450F. Absolutely delicious!
How does the Naturkraft compare to old fashioned starter?

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #7 on: August 24, 2020, 01:10:22 PM »
How does the Naturkraft compare to old fashioned starter?

The flavor benefit of Naturkraft is much milder than an active sourdough starter - it's barely there, just a bit noticeable in the background, but very nice.
The keeping quality of dough made with Naturkraft is on par with real sourdough - breads last for 3-5 days easy.

The main benefit is that you can just replace 3-4% of your formula's flour with Naturkraft and get a hint of tang without any gluten degradation, excessive sourness or reduction in crust color that can happen when using active sourdough starter. You also don't have to feed or manage the starter so it saves time. My favorite aspect of this is I can wake up one day, decide to make a same day dough, like this 8 hour Focaccia, and add the Naturkraft for boosted flavor and keeping quality. So even if my sourdough starter is unfed in the fridge, I can make a really nice same day dough. 
« Last Edit: August 24, 2020, 01:12:57 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #8 on: September 06, 2020, 12:08:15 AM »
I used https://www.elizabethminchilli.com/2020/04/focaccia-barese/ as a guide, along with the notes from everyone whoís posted above. Decided I needed to do a recipe with semolina AND potato.  Iíve attached my formula for a 18-20 hour cold ferment.

It was really delicious.

Much softer and pillowier than my beloved Losurdo Brothers Italian Deli. In a neutral way. Iíll probably try without potato next time to see what that is like...Iím guessing they donít use it, which is why theirs is chewier. I also
may try a longer ferment. Losurdo Brothers also gets it even crispier than I got it. Probably a hotter oven and even more olive oil in the pan.

Thanks for the tips and inspiration!

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #9 on: September 06, 2020, 02:20:10 AM »
Looks delicious!
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

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Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #10 on: September 06, 2020, 11:59:17 AM »

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #11 on: September 27, 2020, 07:42:35 PM »
Made this again, but this time using Tipo 2 flour - Mulino Marino Burrato, and Renato Boscoís recipe:

500g tipo 2 flour
375g water
10g salt
10g evoo
1.5g IDY

I baked it for 14 mins at 500F, moving it from bottom stone to top stone halfway through. Then cooled down, sliced in half horizontally, stuffed with fresh mozz, cherry tomatoes, balsamic and romaine. Reheated in the oven for 5 mins to get a double crunch pizza - crunchy on top and bottom. It's a little more dense with type 2 flour but still relatively light and quite delicious!
« Last Edit: September 27, 2020, 10:29:48 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2020, 09:54:33 PM »
58% bread flour, 42% semolina, no potato, 71% hydration. Much less soft than it was with the potato. Definitely much closer to my goal of imitating Losurdo Brothers Italian Deli. They might be a bit softer than this was. And I definitely need even more oil in the pans to get to their level.

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #13 on: November 02, 2020, 12:24:42 AM »
58% bread flour, 42% semolina, no potato, 71% hydration. Much less soft than it was with the potato. Definitely much closer to my goal of imitating Losurdo Brothers Italian Deli. They might be a bit softer than this was. And I definitely need even more oil in the pans to get to their level.

Nicely done, Nicky!
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #14 on: November 02, 2020, 12:26:49 AM »
Nicely done, Nicky!

Thanks! Your sandwiches look awesome!

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Offline DoouBall

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Focaccia Barese
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2020, 01:09:24 PM »
The journey continues. In a totally unplanned manner, I made a standard bread dough and last minute turned it into a Focaccia Barese baked in a Pizza in Teglia style:

500g flour (mix of AP + strong flour from Central Milling)
360g water
10g salt
3.6g IDY

Mixed in spiral for about 12 mins, and given a lamination. 2h bulk at RT, then transferred to fridge for 24 hours. Formed dough ball, rested until doubled at RT, about 4-5 hours, spread out Teglia style into an iron pan, topped and baked at 575F for about 15 mins. First 10 minutes was on the oven flour without stone and the second part on a rack towards to top. Really happy with the texture. Bottom was a bit darker than I would have liked so next time, I will only do 6-8 minutes on the bottom shelf before moving it to the top to finish.

The best part about something like this is that you can reheat leftover slices in an oven at 400F for 4-5 minutes and both the top and bottom become supremely crunchy - very satisfying.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2020, 01:15:12 PM by DoouBall »
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2020, 08:41:31 PM »
The journey continues. In a totally unplanned manner, I made a standard bread dough and last minute turned it into a Focaccia Barese baked in a Pizza in Teglia style:

500g flour (mix of AP + strong flour from Central Milling)
360g water
10g salt
3.6g IDY

Mixed in spiral for about 12 mins, and given a lamination. 2h bulk at RT, then transferred to fridge for 24 hours. Formed dough ball, rested until doubled at RT, about 4-5 hours, spread out Teglia style into an iron pan, topped and baked at 575F for about 15 mins. First 10 minutes was on the oven flour without stone and the second part on a rack towards to top. Really happy with the texture. Bottom was a bit darker than I would have liked so next time, I will only do 6-8 minutes on the bottom shelf before moving it to the top to finish.

The best part about something like this is that you can reheat leftover slices in an oven at 400F for 4-5 minutes and both the top and bottom become supremely crunchy - very satisfying.

Very nice! Much airier crumb than your last one. What do you attribute that to? Did you like it?

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2020, 10:41:34 PM »
Thanks Nicky. It's airier for three main reasons.

-Baked in the Pizza in Teglia style - after the dough ball doubles, stretch, place in pan and bake. No waiting for a second rise in the pan.
-Baked at 575 directly on the floor of the oven. With the oven floor heating the pan directly, there is no middleman (the stone). For baking in the Teglia, this works quite well.
-This time, I didn't wait for the dough to triple - it seems that it had more life for oven spring because it wasn't ready to collapse. I'm not quite sure about this though because Johny the Gent advised me to triple the dough balls for this style, but I seem to get better results with just past double.
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

Offline nickyr

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2020, 12:21:55 AM »
Thanks Nicky. It's airier for three main reasons.

-Baked in the Pizza in Teglia style - after the dough ball doubles, stretch, place in pan and bake. No waiting for a second rise in the pan.
-Baked at 575 directly on the floor of the oven. With the oven floor heating the pan directly, there is no middleman (the stone). For baking in the Teglia, this works quite well.
-This time, I didn't wait for the dough to triple - it seems that it had more life for oven spring because it wasn't ready to collapse. I'm not quite sure about this though because Johny the Gent advised me to triple the dough balls for this style, but I seem to get better results with just past double.
How did you like it this way, compared to previously?

Offline DoouBall

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Re: Focaccia Barese
« Reply #19 on: November 21, 2020, 12:29:19 AM »
I loved both of them - they are different.

The method used at the top of the thread resulted in smaller, more even bubble structure and a more tender bite.
The method used in the last attempt resulted in explosive growth in the oven, large uneven bubbles and a chewy but satisfying texture. When reheated, the top and bottom was crackly crisp.

My wife prefers the new method better. Right now I do too - it's just a more interesting texture, despite being less tender.
Alex

Outdoor Oven: Blackstone. Indoor Oven: Gaggenau.

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