A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Pizza steel experience and what went wrong.  (Read 1454 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wiz_d_kidd

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 76
  • Age: 62
  • Location: Maryland, USA
  • Make Mine Large!
Re: Pizza steel experience and what went wrong.
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2020, 09:57:01 AM »
I can't thank you enough wiz_d_kidd, I tried your broil method, my oven would still cycle on/off so it took like an hour to heat up, but boy did it work well. After 2-3 mins of cooking I turned on the broil and cooked the top, and it was as good as I could do with the dough I had.

Thanks ones again.

Thanks. I'm glad it's working for you.  Attached are some pics of what I get using this cooking method. If you like that amount of charring (some people don't) here are a few pointers that might help you achieve it:

1. Get the steel close to the broiler element. Mine is just about 2 inches. (I thought it was closer, but I re-measured it more carefully). Sometimes when the pizza develops a large bubble, it will reach up and actually touch the broiler element! I don't mind the charred results, and proper dough temp and handling reduces the probability of a big bubble.
2. The method relies on the infrared radiation from the broiler to preheat the steel. Air temperature is not important. Do whatever it takes to keep the element on during preheating, such as opening the door slightly. If the steel is close (say 2 inches), it should only take about 20 minutes to preheat. Don't worry about losing hot air by opening the door, because air temp is not important -- you want IR radiation.  If the element cycles off, you're not getting IR radiation, and you won't get the high temps that are needed for this method.
3. Making the broiler element to go on as soon as you launch will reduce the cooking time even further. The pizza is getting intense heat from the broiler above, and the preheated steel below. When I launch, I set my timer for 2 min, but usually pull the pizza after 110 seconds.
4. Formulate your dough for high-temp cooking, i.e. 00 flour, little or no malt, sufficient hydration, etc.

It took me many iterations to fine tune the process for my oven, my dough, and my tastes. Your oven, your dough, and your tastes are undoubtedly different, so adjust things and keep experimenting.


A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress