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Author Topic: Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.  (Read 236 times)

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Offline gordcoffin

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Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.
« on: October 17, 2020, 07:48:32 PM »
Hi! Iím  a newbie making pizzas. I started around 6 months ago and was using cast iron pans to cook my pizzas in. I have changed my dough recipes a few times and have changed to a 00 flour recently. When I was making pizza in the cast iron pans I wouldnít have an issue browning the crust, and I would usually give the dough a head start on the stove first just to get the bottom a little darker. I was pleased with the results. But, the pans are a little small, and I was looking to get that nice cornicione, so I decided to get a pizza stone.
So,  tonight I tried a stone (and using a peel!)for the first time. A lot of factors to try and grasp! Especially for me.😁Made my dough on Thursday night, let rise for an hour, cut into 4 370 gram balls and put in refrigerator for 48 hours. Took out dough for approx an hour and started stretching one at a time, then cook, the do another, etc.
First pizza I made, crust was hard and dry. It looked good, but I over cooked it, trying to brown it I guess.I think I had it in for about 8 mins at 550 on the preheated stone.  I read here in this forum that 00 flour isnít good for home ovens. So, would a bread flour be better for browning the crust? I donít want the crust to be really hard, still want a nice airy softness. The three other pizzas I made got better and better, but second had too much flour on the crust and peel, but 3rd went much better. 4th got stuck to the peel a little so after I freed it up it was a little deformed but came out the best by far. The crust still looked undercooked but it didnít taste like it was. So, I guess my question is, whatís the best type of flour and method for browning the crust while still leaving a soft cornicione? The recipe I used for the dough tonight was:

00 flour: 911g
Water: 546g (60% hydration)
ADY: 6g
Salt: 14 g
Oil: 9g
Sugar: 15g

Cook time on pizza in pics was 5 mins on the stone, bottom rack at 550f. Not sure whatís a good amount of time to leave in for a nice crust thatís not over done. 😔 Is 5 mins a reasonable amount of time for the pizza to cook and brown up without getting hard? I know I should change the flour, so will try some different flour next time. Some advice on how to go about it is needed! 😁 Thanks!
« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 07:51:42 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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Re: Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.
« Reply #1 on: October 18, 2020, 01:59:45 AM »
A malted bread type flour will certainly work a lot better for you right now. Read the ingredient label on the flour bag for contains: malted barley flour, or it may just say "enzymes" (which would be amylase enzymes which act as the malted barley flour does). You can also see if you can find some diastatic malt powder. You will want to have a diastatic malt powder with a 20 degree Lintner Value. This will need to be added to the dough as an ingredient at 0.25%. If you get a diastatic malt with a higher Lintner Value divide the value by 20 and then divide 0.25% by the same number to find the amount to add. For example, if you get a 60 degree Lintner Value malt; 60 divided by 20 = 3 so you will now divide 0.25% by 3 = 0.0833% (this is the amount of the 60-L malt that you will need to add).
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline gordcoffin

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Re: Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2020, 05:30:20 AM »
Thanks for the info. Not sure if I will be able to find malt where I live. Would sugar work, as well? And, if so, how much?

Offline scott r

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Re: Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2020, 10:42:42 AM »
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008T9LX3C/?tag=pmak-20

I buy this one on amazon, its 60L and works better than sugar for what you are looking for as it also seems to help with dough texture.  Sugar along with some diastatic malt might be a good approach, though. 


Tom, what would you consider to be the top percentage range of use for say a 60L diastatic malt.   I obviously don't want a gummy crumb and I know that can happen as you increase the amount of malt.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.
« Reply #4 on: October 18, 2020, 12:37:08 PM »
Not more than 0.5%. The numbers I gave are representative of what it takes to replicate the malting of the flour that takes place at the flour mill.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline scott r

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Re: Getting crust to brown without being to overcooked and hard.
« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2020, 02:22:48 PM »
thank you so much Tom!   I have been using too much at .7 sometimes and I thought I noticed a bit of the gum thing happening but wasnt sure.   Im going to keep it to .5 now

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