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Author Topic: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso  (Read 1017 times)

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Offline Solis

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Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« on: January 02, 2021, 05:30:31 AM »
Hi everybody!

I show you the pictures of my lastest attemps with 100% biga dough with 5 stations sacco rosso flour.

The process:

Biga (no knead Roberto Susta process) :
1kg flour
45% water
0.15% IDY

16h fermentation R.T. (14°C)

Dough:
+20% water
0.15% IDY
2% SALT
2% olive oil
0,3% honney

18hours bulk fermentation C.T. (4°C)
6 Hours 230g balls fermentation R.T. (18°C)

Baked with a modified oven Spice Caliente with a Fiesoli stone.

380°C for a 2-3 minutes

Offline Solis

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Re: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2021, 11:59:50 AM »
I will try to modify the dough recipe, but... I am not sure the way to follow...
What do you think? Must I to increase the dough hidratation or it will be better to increase the time into the fridge for a few hours more (+6h for example)? I want to have a more puffy edge...

Offline billg

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Re: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2021, 02:46:38 PM »
I will try to modify the dough recipe, but... I am not sure the way to follow...
What do you think? Must I to increase the dough hidratation or it will be better to increase the time into the fridge for a few hours more (+6h for example)? I want to have a more puffy edge...

One thing I would suggest is to leave about an inch or an inch and half for the cornicione so that no sauce comes into contact with the dough.

Offline Solis

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Re: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2021, 04:35:10 PM »
One thing I would suggest is to leave about an inch or an inch and half for the cornicione so that no sauce comes into contact with the dough.
Ok! I take note of that! Thanks!

Offline Yael

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Re: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2021, 07:48:37 PM »
Solis,

Is the picture of the dough balls we see taken just after balling, of after fermentation? If after balling, they look nice; if after fermentation, it seems to me it's not enough.

Judging by the result of the pizza, some coloring is lacking, this can be because of:
- fermentation issue (not enough or too much)
- baking temperature issue (not high enough)
- baking time (not enough)
- flour not adapted to "low" temperature bakes
- not enough sugar in the dough (linked to all the above)

About the puffing you're looking for, you can get a better one with (generally speaking):
- a higher baking temp
- a higher hydration
- baking at the sweet spot of the ball's fermentation (check the drawing at reply 10: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=55839.msg562393#msg562393)

Do you get a puffy edge when making a standard direct dough? I would suggest to master the direct doughs first if it's not the case yet, then start messing with preferments. I say that because there are so many recipes and videos on the internet and a lot of beginners don't actually know where to begin, but the best way to learn is to start with the easy basis, then up the difficulty little by little.
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

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Offline Solis

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Re: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2021, 07:08:33 AM »
Solis,

Is the picture of the dough balls we see taken just after balling, of after fermentation? If after balling, they look nice; if after fermentation, it seems to me it's not enough.


Yes, It is after balling. After 20h of bulk fermentation (before 6h balling fermentation)


Judging by the result of the pizza, some coloring is lacking, this can be because of:
- fermentation issue (not enough or too much)
- baking temperature issue (not high enough)
- baking time (not enough)
- flour not adapted to "low" temperature bakes
- not enough sugar in the dough (linked to all the above)

I will modify the fermentation time (+2/4hours)
I use a Spice caliente oven modified, the baking temperature was 390ºC, 2-3 minutes.


About the puffing you're looking for, you can get a better one with (generally speaking):
- a higher baking temp
- a higher hydration
- baking at the sweet spot of the ball's fermentation (check the drawing at reply 10: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=55839.msg562393#msg562393)

Ok, thanks, I will review this post.

Do you get a puffy edge when making a standard direct dough? I would suggest to master the direct doughs first if it's not the case yet, then start messing with preferments. I say that because there are so many recipes and videos on the internet and a lot of beginners don't actually know where to begin, but the best way to learn is to start with the easy basis, then up the difficulty little by little.

The flour that I use to make a direct dough have a W lower, I am not sure if this characteristic can have higher influence with diferents ways to do the dough... Thats true that I can find a lot of recipes in the web...
I will review the craig's table in order to try with a new direct dough


In the other hand, I am looking for the photo of the edge section to give you more information.

Thanks for your support, and sorry for my english...

Offline Yael

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Re: Biga dough attemps with 5stagioni sacco rosso
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2021, 07:03:04 PM »
Don't need to be sorry for your English, I am not a native English speaker either  :-D

What flour do you usually use? What W value? It's just an issue of protein/gluten content, meaning the more the gluten, the more the dough can handle long fermentation and prefermentation, high hydration, and is more "forgiving", but this doesn't mean you cannot achieve something as good with a lower W.
As I often write, I use in China a Russian imported flour which is I guess an "all purpose", maybe T55, and cheaper than the local ones. It's 10.3% proteins, so that would be the equivalent of a W200~250 I guess. I make 24H RTF; 2-3 days CF; already went up to 80% hydration...
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

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