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Author Topic: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza  (Read 611192 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1480 on: January 08, 2020, 08:30:19 PM »
Never experienced any burning due to sugar

icemanxp300  has made many papa johns clones using steel that came out great

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26286.msg477391#msg477391
MadMatt,

Thank you for reminding us of icemanxp300's good results using a steel.

Peter

Offline hodgey1

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1481 on: January 13, 2020, 07:44:34 AM »
I am a longtime pizza maker and just purchased a new LG double oven range. I decided to give the new oven a test drive this weekend for my grandsons 7th birthday. I have been primarily only making pizza in the summers in my WFO, so my in the house oven skills are tarnished. Thinking I wanted to do something new and out of my typical Neo-NY style, I planned on using Pete-zza Papa John's clone recipe.

Everything turned Out great, except a mistake in using the convection portion of my new dual oven. The bottoms of the pizza were barely cooked, while the tops were perfectly cooked. I used 500*F at 8-9 minutes on a wire pizza screen. It came to me in the middle of the night that the lower convection oven does not have an element on the bottom and why the hardly baked bottoms. I mentioned this to my wife this morning, who pulled the owners manual out and read the portion that said to use the upper oven and not the convection :-[.

Besides that mistake, the pies turned out nice and everyone still enjoyed them even with white bottoms. Thanks Pete for all your work, I used the WMGV puree recipe for the sauce and really liked it!

Offline Dante3346

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1482 on: January 17, 2020, 02:31:43 PM »
Would i be able to use active dry yeast, vegetable oil, and a pizza stone to try to recreate the Papa John's Pizza

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1483 on: January 17, 2020, 02:50:39 PM »
Would i be able to use active dry yeast, vegetable oil, and a pizza stone to try to recreate the Papa John's Pizza
Dante3346,

Yes. If you choose to use ADY, you will want to use an amount that is equivalent to IDY in terms of performance. And you will need to prehydrate the ADY in a small amount of warm water at around 105 degrees F for about ten minutes before using in the recipe you select. As for the soybean oil, you can see at https://www.papajohns.com/company/papa-johns-ingredients.html that PJ's dough uses soybean oil, which is a form of vegetable oil, so you would be fine using soybean oil. As for using a pizza stone, several members have done so in trying to make PJ clone pizzas but care must be exercised because the PJ dough contains a lot of sugar and that increases the likelihood of the bottom of the crust browning too much and possibly burning when the pizza is baked on a hot pizza stone. If you search this thread (using the search box at the top right hand side of the page), using the expression pizza stone, you should find a lot of examples where members have used pizza stones.

Peter

Offline PentiumIIPizza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1484 on: February 04, 2020, 05:00:02 AM »
Hi,

I have never made an American Style before and would like to try this at reply #20:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg59217#msg59217

Can anyone help with adapting the above recipe to the following requirements?
  • Cold fermentation for 20 hours.
  • ADY instead of IDY.
  • Size reduced from 14" to 12".
Thanks!

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1485 on: February 04, 2020, 11:24:35 AM »
Hi,

I have never made an American Style before and would like to try this at reply #20:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6758.msg59217#msg59217

Can anyone help with adapting the above recipe to the following requirements?
  • Cold fermentation for 20 hours.
  • ADY instead of IDY.
  • Size reduced from 14" to 12".
Thanks!
PentiumIIPizza,

Using the expanded dough calculating tool at https://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded-calculator.html with the information you provided, I came up with the dough formulation posted below for you to test. In doing so, I should also mention that I used the yeast chart at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26831.0 (click to enlarge) to determine the amount of ADY to use if you plan to cold ferment the dough for 20 hours. In using the yeast chart, I assumed a fermentation temperature of 3 degrees C (38 degrees F), which is fairly typical of the temperature of a standard home refrigerator in the US. Should that differ in your case since you are in Denmark, you should feel free to modify the amount of ADY using the abovementioned yeast chart. Also, when using ADY, you will want to activate it in a small amount of the formula water at around 38 degrees C (100 degrees F) for about ten minutes. It can then be added to the rest of the formula water. I am also assuming that you will be using a bread flour with a typical protein content of around 12.7%. If you do not have such a flour, you may want to adjust the hydration value of the dough formulation to be a bit lower if, for example, you plan to use an all purpose flour. Finally, you will note that I used a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%. So you should adjust the weight of the dough on a scale to achieve a final value of around 437 grams.

Bread Flour (100%):
Water (56.5%):
ADY (0.42%):
Salt (1.75%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (7.3%):
Sugar (4.2%):
Total (170.17%):
260.9 g  |  9.2 oz | 0.58 lbs
147.41 g  |  5.2 oz | 0.32 lbs
1.1 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.29 tsp | 0.1 tbsp
4.57 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.82 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
19.05 g | 0.67 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.19 tsp | 1.4 tbsp
10.96 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.75 tsp | 0.92 tbsp
443.97 g | 15.66 oz | 0.98 lbs | TF = 0.1384663
Note: The dough (437 grams) is for a single 12" pizza; the nominal thickness factor is 0.13642; the bowl residue compensation value is 1.5%.

I wish you luck if you decide to try the dough formulation posted above and feel free to report back on your results.

Peter

Offline PentiumIIPizza

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Re: Pete-zza's Papa John's Clone Pizza
« Reply #1486 on: February 18, 2020, 03:13:33 AM »
PentiumIIPizza,

Using the expanded dough calculating tool at https://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded-calculator.html with the information you provided, I came up with the dough formulation posted below for you to test. In doing so, I should also mention that I used the yeast chart at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26831.0 (click to enlarge) to determine the amount of ADY to use if you plan to cold ferment the dough for 20 hours. In using the yeast chart, I assumed a fermentation temperature of 3 degrees C (38 degrees F), which is fairly typical of the temperature of a standard home refrigerator in the US. Should that differ in your case since you are in Denmark, you should feel free to modify the amount of ADY using the abovementioned yeast chart. Also, when using ADY, you will want to activate it in a small amount of the formula water at around 38 degrees C (100 degrees F) for about ten minutes. It can then be added to the rest of the formula water. I am also assuming that you will be using a bread flour with a typical protein content of around 12.7%. If you do not have such a flour, you may want to adjust the hydration value of the dough formulation to be a bit lower if, for example, you plan to use an all purpose flour. Finally, you will note that I used a bowl residue compensation of 1.5%. So you should adjust the weight of the dough on a scale to achieve a final value of around 437 grams.

Bread Flour (100%):
Water (56.5%):
ADY (0.42%):
Salt (1.75%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (7.3%):
Sugar (4.2%):
Total (170.17%):
260.9 g  |  9.2 oz | 0.58 lbs
147.41 g  |  5.2 oz | 0.32 lbs
1.1 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.29 tsp | 0.1 tbsp
4.57 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.82 tsp | 0.27 tbsp
19.05 g | 0.67 oz | 0.04 lbs | 4.19 tsp | 1.4 tbsp
10.96 g | 0.39 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.75 tsp | 0.92 tbsp
443.97 g | 15.66 oz | 0.98 lbs | TF = 0.1384663
Note: The dough (437 grams) is for a single 12" pizza; the nominal thickness factor is 0.13642; the bowl residue compensation value is 1.5%.

I wish you luck if you decide to try the dough formulation posted above and feel free to report back on your results.

Peter

Pete-zza,

Thank your very much for the help.

I followed your instructions and the pizza(s) came out great. Soft and tender. I Immediately noticed the sweetness, which is something I'm not used to in a pizza, but the taste quickly grew on me as the sweetness combined with cheese and savoury pepperoni united into something special. I ended up eating two 12" pizzas, as I had made an extra batch of dough in case something went wrong during baking.

I don't own a pizza screen, but burning was not a problem in my case as the bottom of both pizzas ended up with a nice golden color.

In my previous post I wrote that I've never made an American Style pizza before, but that's not true as I have been working for six months perfecting a Pizza Hut pan pizza clone, getting a lot of help from this forum. I just thought of that as pan pizza, but this is of course also an American Style.

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