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Author Topic: Cardboard Peel  (Read 350 times)

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Offline Pizza Shark

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Cardboard Peel
« on: September 26, 2017, 05:34:16 PM »
A couple photos of my cheapo cardboard peel (just replaced my prior piece of cardboard after 4 years of use). Note the key to the cardboard peel is to find a piece with creases on the right and left sides that give it strength when you curl them up to deliver to the stone.  Also migration of toppings to the center is noted (why I always go heavier on sauce, cheese and toppings on the outside and light in the middle) - It all migrates to the middle. 


Offline Glutenboy

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Re: Cardboard Peel
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2017, 05:46:15 PM »
A couple photos of my cheapo cardboard peel (just replaced my prior piece of cardboard after 4 years of use). Note the key to the cardboard peel is to find a piece with creases on the right and left sides that give it strength when you curl them up to deliver to the stone.  Also migration of toppings to the center is noted (why I always go heavier on sauce, cheese and toppings on the outside and light in the middle) - It all migrates to the middle.
That cheapo cardboard peel makes one beautiful pie!
Quote under my pic excludes Little Caesar's.

Offline Josh123

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Re: Cardboard Peel
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2017, 09:41:18 AM »
not so beautiful pizzas but they taste great
30% levain (my own culture)
72 hr cold rise, 4 hour warm rise
67% hydration
KA bread flour
575 in a gas oven
18x18 floor tile (1" cordierite slab is in the mail) One tile is above the pizza and one tile the pizza is baked on. Broiler not used.
Pepperoni: 7/11 with a very small about of sugar and salt, Sorento mozzarella
White: Ricotta, Sorento mozzarella, black pepper, chopped garlic

Need to improve my launch so the pizzas don't get so messy


Offline Pizza Shark

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Re: Cardboard Peel
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2017, 05:59:55 PM »
I like that video but MAN IS THAT A LOT OF RAW FLOUR!  I think that video is great for those just learning to stretch and the extra flour does make it much easier (allowing for longer time to top) but all I can think about watching that is "chalky crust" when I see that much raw flour used. 

Everyone's goal as they improve should be to use less and less flour during the stretch process.  I personally use Red Mill semolina flour to dust my peel for the primary reason that it acts as thousands of little ball bearings when sliding onto the stone... No need for all that flour.  Then, when I pull the pie after the bake I place it on a cooling rack and I can shake that rack back and forth underneath releasing most all of the residual semolina flour that leaves me with none of that chalky flour on the bottom.  When you bite into a slice of pizza if that initial bite leaves your tongue feeling dry and chalky - that's that added common flour that never gets truly incorporated into the dough.         

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Cardboard Peel
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2017, 07:05:30 PM »
I think it's really not a problem...that flour never makes it to the peel..shakes off during stretch

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Offline Josh123

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Re: Cardboard Peel
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2017, 11:59:10 PM »
I like that video but MAN IS THAT A LOT OF RAW FLOUR!  I think that video is great for those just learning to stretch and the extra flour does make it much easier (allowing for longer time to top) but all I can think about watching that is "chalky crust" when I see that much raw flour used. 

Everyone's goal as they improve should be to use less and less flour during the stretch process.  I personally use Red Mill semolina flour to dust my peel for the primary reason that it acts as thousands of little ball bearings when sliding onto the stone... No need for all that flour.  Then, when I pull the pie after the bake I place it on a cooling rack and I can shake that rack back and forth underneath releasing most all of the residual semolina flour that leaves me with none of that chalky flour on the bottom.  When you bite into a slice of pizza if that initial bite leaves your tongue feeling dry and chalky - that's that added common flour that never gets truly incorporated into the dough.       

The above poster (Dangerous Salumi) needs to learn the fundamentals of stretching pizza, then learn the finer points.

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