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Author Topic: Laminated Chicago Stuffed  (Read 24237 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #80 on: January 15, 2015, 05:48:00 PM »
Is this dough supposed to rise?
Thanks

   Only if you use yeast that isn't dead.
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Offline toekneemac

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #81 on: January 15, 2015, 08:39:33 PM »
I ask because maybe it rose a little bit, but not much. Yeast should be good.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #82 on: January 15, 2015, 09:23:18 PM »
I ask because maybe it rose a little bit, but not much. Yeast should be good.

During the complete 48 hrs toe?
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Offline toekneemac

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #83 on: January 15, 2015, 10:03:26 PM »
During the complete 48 hrs toe?

Just starting my last 12 hours.  I used pizza garages formulation ran through the deep dish/stuffed dough calculator.  That gave me roughly 1/3 teaspoon of yeast, so it's not too much.  Did the dough double? No. But...was it supposed to I guess is my question.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #84 on: January 15, 2015, 10:44:07 PM »
Just starting my last 12 hours.  I used pizza garages formulation ran through the deep dish/stuffed dough calculator.  That gave me roughly 1/3 teaspoon of yeast, so it's not too much.  Did the dough double? No. But...was it supposed to I guess is my question.
There's 9% fat in there and that will hold it back a little....I'm not sure the effect of 4% milk powder is going to do on the 46% hydration so I will have to defer to PG on this....but it sure seems like you should be seeing close to double by now.  Don't know what your ferment temp is so maybe it will still take off....bet it will.
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Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #85 on: January 15, 2015, 11:09:47 PM »
This will take 48 to get the proper results and in my testing at 36-38 degrees.  I use SAF instant.  I used the poppy seed method to test the time frame, the dough will go up to 4 days with good results....


Offline toekneemac

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #86 on: January 15, 2015, 11:16:07 PM »
I used ady rapid rise, a new package.  The week before I opened another pack and made actuall bread and it was alive.  I am going to proof some from the package I used for this dough and see if it is alive or not.

I did make two of the same dough one day about 12 hours apart. The first dough is larger than the first, about the size of a 16" softball.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2015, 11:21:42 PM by toekneemac »

Offline Garvey

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #87 on: January 16, 2015, 04:58:46 AM »
Don't stress, man. :D

I've had plenty of doughs where I've wondered if they'd come out because they didn't seem to rise much, but once I started to manipulate them and then bake them up, they turned out just fine.

Cheers,
Garvey
« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 05:09:46 AM by Garvey »

Offline Garvey

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #88 on: January 16, 2015, 05:05:50 AM »
Did the dough double? No. But...was it supposed to I guess is my question.

I'm guessing with low hydration, medium(-ish) oil, low yeast, low(-ish) gluten, and a cold rise, the overall growth shouldn't be too dramatic, eh?
« Last Edit: January 16, 2015, 05:07:40 AM by Garvey »

Offline toekneemac

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #89 on: January 18, 2015, 11:33:25 AM »
I'm guessing with low hydration, medium(-ish) oil, low yeast, low(-ish) gluten, and a cold rise, the overall growth shouldn't be too dramatic, eh?

I made two doughs at different times. The first dough did rise a bit, but did not double. 


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Offline Reek

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #90 on: November 03, 2015, 04:23:02 PM »
Anyone know of the dough ball weight for the recipe? I could eye it... but i need to nail this one  >:(
« Last Edit: November 03, 2015, 06:37:16 PM by Reek »

Offline SloW8

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #91 on: January 28, 2016, 01:41:50 PM »
Sorry to bring up such an old thread but...

Do you melt the butter before you add it or just let it soften?   

Do you work the dough right out of the fridge or do you let it sit 2 hours or so to come up to temp? 

Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #92 on: February 12, 2016, 11:17:19 PM »
Yes, the butter is melted before adding to the dough and the dough will sit at room temp for 1 to 1.5 hours after removing from the fridge....ideally I like to see 55 degrees before I'll open up the ball....

Offline camanodawg

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #93 on: September 21, 2016, 07:00:28 PM »
Quick question for guys - i just got my first mixer  ;D - was wondering for this fine looking Laminated Chicago Stuffed crust - do you use the paddle or dough hook when mixing?

Offline dstagl

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Re: Laminated Chicago Stuffed
« Reply #94 on: December 03, 2016, 01:42:08 PM »
I was in Minneapolis a few weeks ago on business, and they have a couple of Giordano's up there now so I couldn't help but pay them a visit. Tasted just like the real thing from back home in Chicago.

It was pretty crowded so I sat at the bar which was also right next to the kitchen where I could watch everything they were doing. Here are a couple of photos I snapped of how they "butter" their pans--I suppose it might be margarine, but I'll just call it butter. They had a little sponge they used to literally sponge butter into the pans.

I didn't really get photos of the dough process they were using, but they basically had a big hunk of dough right by the sheeter. They would tear some off, ball it up, and put it through the sheeter. Then they would literally toss the dough disk across the kitchen to where the pizzas were being assembled. Extra dough from assembly would then get tossed back and put back into the dough by the sheeter.


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