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Author Topic: Essen1's NY-style pizza project  (Read 359496 times)

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Offline CaptBob

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2560 on: January 09, 2019, 11:09:12 PM »
Mikes dough @4 days baked in the breville. Still has life.one dough left going to see if I can get 5 day out of a batch.

Holy crap Larry....that's freaking beautiful!! :chef:
Bob

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2561 on: January 11, 2019, 08:45:40 AM »
Well, Mike about the Waring oven, unfortunately someone already purchased it. However there's a 208v Bakers Pride P44 for sale for $300, seller says it's as is, but I WON'T buy it unless he plugs it up and I can see the elements heat up.
Hopefully it'll perform well.
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

Offline norcoscia

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2562 on: January 11, 2019, 08:57:55 AM »
I think the elements on the 208v model will work on 220v but they will not preform the same (they have different Part Numbers if I remember correctly). I know you are in to hurry and get an oven but in your situation you might better served to wait until what you really want comes along (IMHO). Doing the kabuki to move and get the 2 circuit oven hooked into you dryer vent and unhooked will not be fun - Mike mentioned (weeks ago) someone was selling Waring on eBay and a member here purchased one - he said it was like new - maybe Mike knows if they still have any. I really think that is a much better option for you. BTW, I think some Costco business centers carry them - maybe you could check into that as an option - also look into the webrestaurant store - ding/dent store - they get ovens in all the time that are new, work great but might have a ding in them.
Norm
Baker's Pride GP-61 NG, Baker's Pride M02T 220V, PizzaParty Ardore (with saputo tiles) LP
Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2563 on: January 11, 2019, 09:20:02 AM »
I think the elements on the 208v model will work on 220v but they will not preform the same (they have different Part Numbers if I remember correctly). I know you are in to hurry and get an oven but in your situation you might better served to wait until what you really want comes along (IMHO). Doing the kabuki to move and get the 2 circuit oven hooked into you dryer vent and unhooked will not be fun - Mike mentioned (weeks ago) someone was selling Waring on eBay and a member here purchased one - he said it was like new - maybe Mike knows if they still have any. I really think that is a much better option for you. BTW, I think some Costco business centers carry them - maybe you could check into that as an option - also look into the webrestaurant store - ding/dent store - they get ovens in all the time that are new, work great but might have a ding in them.
I thought dryer outlets where 208v, oh ok. This is complicated, so homes don't have 208v outlets?

I looked at the ebay seller, sold out, only the larger ones are available.

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Offline norcoscia

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2564 on: January 11, 2019, 09:51:38 AM »
Voltages can be tricky to understand - as the electricity moves farther down the house wiring the resistance (of the wire) drops some of the voltage, the thinner the wire and the longer the run the more voltage is dropped. That is why sometimes you see 110V or 115V listed when at the breaker panel it will generally measure ~120. Same thing with 220v circuits - but 208 is not the same as 220v. 208 is a common voltage used in other countries (I think Mexico is one of them).

With older Bakers Pride ovens it might not be a problem since the heating elements are just very thin highly resistive wires in a insulting material (usually ceramic) with a metal cover - same principle mentioned above, magnified a lot. Voltage comes in one end of the heating element - a ton of voltage is dropped across the heating element (that voltage drop converts the energy into heat) - the heating element glows hot. In newer ovens the heating elements are the same but newer ovens may have other electrical components that are more sensitive and are not designed to work with the voltages well below what the oven was designed to operate on (I would need to do a total design review to be sure, depending on the oven). In the older ovens it was just some lights, switches and analog temperature controllers. They did not care about the voltage as much, maybe the light would be a tiny bit dimmer or the element would be a little less hot. I could go on for weeks (I did teach things like this for 4 years) but I'm sure you have already stopped reading so I will stop typing. Sorry for the long post but if you did not stop reading happy to answer any questions you might have....
Norm
Baker's Pride GP-61 NG, Baker's Pride M02T 220V, PizzaParty Ardore (with saputo tiles) LP
Focus is NY style but do others too
Preferred Flour (for NY pies) is All Trumps BB
Preferred temperature for NY is 550F, for NP 900+F
Preferred type of yeast IDY

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Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2565 on: January 11, 2019, 10:04:05 AM »
Voltages can be tricky to understand - as the electricity moves farther down the house wiring the resistance (of the wire) drops some of the voltage, the thinner the wire and the longer the run the more voltage is dropped. That is why sometimes you see 110V or 115V listed when at the breaker panel it will generally measure ~120. Same thing with 220v circuits - but 208 is not the same as 220v. 208 is a common voltage used in other countries (I think Mexico is one of them).

With older Bakers Pride ovens it might not be a problem since the heating elements are just very thin highly resistive wires in a insulting material (usually ceramic) with a metal cover - same principle mentioned above, magnified a lot. Voltage comes in one end of the heating element - a ton of voltage is dropped across the heating element (that voltage drop converts the energy into heat) - the heating element glows hot. In newer ovens the heating elements are the same but newer ovens may have other electrical components that are more sensitive and are not designed to work with the voltages well below what the oven was designed to operate on (I would need to do a total design review to be sure, depending on the oven). In the older ovens it was just some lights, switches and analog temperature controllers. They did not care about the voltage as much, maybe the light would be a tiny bit dimmer or the element would be a little less hot. I could go on for weeks (I did teach things like this for 4 years) but I'm sure you have already stopped reading so I will stop typing. Sorry for the long post but if you did not stop reading happy to answer any questions you might have....
I researched it a bit, apparently if I where to use it, I risk over heating it. Long story short it will run at a 25% increased wattage
So basically a no go...Some 220v elements are also NLA so I couldn't even convert it.
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

Offline kenny911

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2566 on: January 11, 2019, 10:05:28 AM »

Which recipe did you use? Iím going through this thread and see a lot of variations.


Hi Mike, over the years I have tried a lot of recipes Iím the NY thread. All worked well if me as the cook did my job. At properly following the method set by the recipe.
 I came upon your thread when I tried to dial in my omnican oven which is a knock off of the warring oven you have been so successful with.
 I do not mak much NY pizza. When I git my breville oven I wanted to try all typed of pizza from it.
  My Neapolitan turned out well. Detroit style was pretty good. The NY sucked. So, I decided to pull up your thread and looked at your different recipes and liked the looks of you high hydration straight dough.
 With your help I have a recipe that I am happy with.
 Sunday I made a batch and used it today at the 72 hour mark.
  I had a mobile pizza operator Art Napoli from pizza 800 visit me . He had seen the instagram posts and was skeptical that the pizzas were coming from the breville oven.
 So we baked a NY with your recipe. He was plesently surprised by the pizza.
 Art is the kind of person that tells it like it is. And to get a good review from him too me means a lot.  I did take your advice and pulled the pizza a little earlier then I personally like. Glad I did the taste and texture was very good.
 Not sure why I am busting into your thread like this. Other to thanks you for your direction!!

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2567 on: January 11, 2019, 01:31:35 PM »
Which recipe did you use? Iím going through this thread and see a lot of variations.

Kenny,

Itís this one...

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8093.2440
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2568 on: January 11, 2019, 01:33:24 PM »
I think the elements on the 208v model will work on 220v but they will not preform the same (they have different Part Numbers if I remember correctly). I know you are in to hurry and get an oven but in your situation you might better served to wait until what you really want comes along (IMHO). Doing the kabuki to move and get the 2 circuit oven hooked into you dryer vent and unhooked will not be fun - Mike mentioned (weeks ago) someone was selling Waring on eBay and a member here purchased one - he said it was like new - maybe Mike knows if they still have any. I really think that is a much better option for you. BTW, I think some Costco business centers carry them - maybe you could check into that as an option - also look into the webrestaurant store - ding/dent store - they get ovens in all the time that are new, work great but might have a ding in them.

The eBay one is gone and I dont think they have other ones. But the Warings do pop up from time to time.
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2569 on: January 19, 2019, 01:44:48 AM »
2-hr dough, baked at 700F. Very light and airy, yet crisp.
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

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Offline thezaman

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2570 on: January 19, 2019, 04:50:53 AM »
mike, fabulous results. In you Instagram post you mentioned your formula. Can you go thru your procedure here? Your dough temperature and proofing temperature would help a lot. Thanks for any details you can provide.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2571 on: January 19, 2019, 05:03:54 AM »
mike, fabulous results. In you Instagram post you mentioned your formula. Can you go thru your procedure here? Your dough temperature and proofing temperature would help a lot. Thanks for any details you can provide.

Thanks, Larry.

Mixing was the same as I always do...flour, malt, sugar, yeast. Combine, then add water. Mix until now raw flour is visible. Let hydrate for 20-30 mins, then add salt and mix for 2 mins, then add oil. Mix for 5 mins then bench rest for 15 mins. This dough came off the hook a little warmer than I normally like but it worked out just fine.

Ball and proof. Thatís it.


18Ē pizza

Open
GramsOunces
Flour100%35813
Water (65%)2338
Instant Dry Yeast (1%)40
Regular/Fine Sea Salt (2.5%)90
Diastatic Malt Powder (2%)70
Olive Oil (2%)70
Sugar (1%)40
Total (173.5%)62122
Single Ball62122

Edit: Added a more detailed description.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2019, 04:22:47 PM by Essen1 »
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

Offline MisterPKM

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2572 on: January 19, 2019, 09:59:50 AM »
Hey Mike,


Have really been enjoying your New Year Naturally Leavened dough. It tastes very good here, but have had some hiccups to work through. First time was user error due to my mixing. Second batch was much better mixed via the Beddia method, but both are still a little tough to stretch then a touch tough. Thinking of adding some AP flour to soften? Maybe more oil to fatten it a bit more? Flavor is A+, though so will continue to use it and play around.
 One pepperoni and one queso fresco, ham, Sichuan chili oil.
« Last Edit: January 19, 2019, 10:02:30 AM by MisterPKM »

Offline Minolta Rokkor

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2573 on: January 19, 2019, 10:38:35 AM »
2-hr dough, baked at 700F. Very light and airy, yet crisp.
Your ability to top a pie with precise balance and top notch presentation never ceases to amaze me. Good job.
Pizza is about balance, nothing more nothing less

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2574 on: January 19, 2019, 12:48:50 PM »
mike, fabulous results. In you Instagram post you mentioned your formula. Can you go thru your procedure here? Your dough temperature and proofing temperature would help a lot. Thanks for any details you can provide.

Larry,

I forgot to mention that I didnít pay attention to proofing temp and the like. Only finished dough temp. It was basically a dough just for sh!ts & giggles but it came out really nice  :)
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

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Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2575 on: January 19, 2019, 12:49:52 PM »
Your ability to top a pie with precise balance and top notch presentation never ceases to amaze me. Good job.

Iím not so sure about that but thank you!
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2576 on: January 19, 2019, 12:52:18 PM »
Hey Mike,


Have really been enjoying your New Year Naturally Leavened dough. It tastes very good here, but have had some hiccups to work through. First time was user error due to my mixing. Second batch was much better mixed via the Beddia method, but both are still a little tough to stretch then a touch tough. Thinking of adding some AP flour to soften? Maybe more oil to fatten it a bit more? Flavor is A+, though so will continue to use it and play around.
 One pepperoni and one queso fresco, ham, Sichuan chili oil.

MisterPKM,

Just to clarify, it is not a naturally leavened dough. Itís a dough with a poolish/preferment.

Anyway, your pies look nice! Keep at it and keep tweaking it to your liking.
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

Offline MisterPKM

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2577 on: January 19, 2019, 02:18:44 PM »
MisterPKM,

Just to clarify, it is not a naturally leavened dough. Itís a dough with a poolish/preferment.

Anyway, your pies look nice! Keep at it and keep tweaking it to your liking.


Thanks! I thought since I was using my current starter it was naturally leavened? Either way, it's awesome!

I am going to up the oil on my next batch. I'm afraid to add AP because if I'm getting tears now, I am not sure AP will hold up.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2578 on: January 19, 2019, 04:24:51 PM »

Thanks! I thought since I was using my current starter it was naturally leavened? Either way, it's awesome!

I am going to up the oil on my next batch. I'm afraid to add AP because if I'm getting tears now, I am not sure AP will hold up.

Nice! I think the oil level is pretty spot on but it's up to you and personal preference, of course.

What kind of flour are you using?
Mike

ďAll styles of pizza are valid. I make the best Iím capable of; you should make the best youíre capable of. I donít want to make somebody elseís pizza.Ē ~ Chris Bianco

Offline MisterPKM

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Re: Essen1's NY-style pizza project
« Reply #2579 on: January 19, 2019, 08:46:02 PM »
Nice! I think the oil level is pretty spot on but it's up to you and personal preference, of course.

What kind of flour are you using?

KABF but AP on the bench and board.

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