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Author Topic: Jets pizza  (Read 137070 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #260 on: March 13, 2017, 04:56:39 PM »
HarryHaller73,

You can see my analysis of the Jet's pizza in a series of posts starting at Reply 194 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg413711#msg413711

There is also a lot of background information in the post at Reply 26 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg118161#msg118161.

Peter

Online HarryHaller73

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #261 on: March 13, 2017, 05:57:41 PM »
HarryHaller73,

You can see my analysis of the Jet's pizza in a series of posts starting at Reply 194 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg413711#msg413711

There is also a lot of background information in the post at Reply 26 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg118161#msg118161.

Peter

Thanks for the links.

My initial impression of the crust was that it is pretty amazing and yet very uncomplicated, what stands out is an almost fossilized undercrust which produces a big crunch.  This is their "hook".  This simple thing differentiates it from other soggy pan pizzas on market.   There are some interesting information in your links that I saw, regarding oil used to grease the pan.  Though the data shows corn oil only, there's definitely an artificial flavoring added somewhere, as corn oil doesn't naturally taste like butter.  Tasting the sauce, there's alot more going on there too, and reminds me of Chuck E. Cheese pizza sauce in the 80's in a good way.  There's something nostalgic about the pizza flavor.   To clone this pizza begins with getting the undercrust texture right.  In my experience, is low/intermediate hydration, lower temp and longer bake.  To dry out the undercrust as much as possible without burning it.

I find another way their model differentiates against competitors is via tight quality control of workflow and ingredient sourcing and prep.  Unused old doughs are thrown out, and made fresh daily unlike other chains who'll use delivered dough out to many days.  Vegetables are cut in house daily, etc.  Nothing complicated just fresher ingredients and strict adherence to processes.  And these things seem cyclical to chains.  For instance, about a decade ago, Dominos rebooted with better processes and ingredients and they've cleaned up in market share while Papa Johns has regressed and imo, was the better product at one point.

« Last Edit: March 13, 2017, 07:12:55 PM by HarryHaller73 »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #262 on: March 13, 2017, 06:21:16 PM »
HarryHaller73,

On the matter of the crunch, you might take a look at Reply 21, at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg415258#msg415258, and also Reply 214 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8247.msg415286#msg415286. There is also a fair amount of follow-up discussion after Reply 214.

There will always be issues when trying to replicate a commercial pizza but using a home oven. It also means having the right pan.

Peter

Offline amkelly

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Re: Jets pizza
« Reply #263 on: March 21, 2017, 08:28:29 PM »
Having been in Jets before they started branding their supplies, my husband saw them using Whirl to coat the deep dish pans.  So the last time I was there, I saw a bottle with their name on it.....and it was turned enough to see the name of Whirl on the back.  I purchased some a couple of weeks ago and it made a world of difference in the crunch and taste.

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