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Author Topic: The Pizza Bible  (Read 55363 times)

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Offline DoouBall

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  • Posts: 83
Re: The Pizza Bible
« Reply #260 on: January 11, 2017, 01:07:21 PM »
Hey Guys, I made some pizzas last week using the Master Dough with Poolish and they were the best New York Style pizzas I've made to date. Used Grain Craft Power Flour, 65% hydration, ADY, and 18 hour Poolish with 48 hour balled dough fridge rise. Baked in home oven at 570F. 5 minutes on top stone followed by 1-2 minutes on bottom stone to crisp up the bottom. Great roasted wheat flavor, wonderful rise, satisfying chew but not tough at all. Using a top stone to cook the pizza and the bottom stone at the end just to crisp up the bottom works great! Also, the New York New Jersey Tomato Sauce was a real winner!

Quick question - have any of you tried Master Dough with Poolish and Master Dough with Tiga? I'm wondering what the difference is in terms of flavor and texture. Poolish seems so much easier to make and contributes to elasticity, while Biga/Tiga is supposed to add strength, so I'm wondering why you'd want to add a strength building preferment to a High Gluten flour, unless it adds a much better flavor? It seems to be counterproductive to building a tender pizza. Is there really any benefit?

Thanks!

Alex
« Last Edit: January 11, 2017, 05:23:59 PM by DoouBall »

Offline jimpurcellbbne

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  • Posts: 7
  • Location: Tucson
  • Producing great pizza with my home oven!
Re: The Pizza Bible
« Reply #261 on: January 30, 2017, 10:43:31 AM »
Hey Guys, I made some pizzas last week using the Master Dough with Poolish and they were the best New York Style pizzas I've made to date. Used Grain Craft Power Flour, 65% hydration, ADY, and 18 hour Poolish with 48 hour balled dough fridge rise. Baked in home oven at 570F. 5 minutes on top stone followed by 1-2 minutes on bottom stone to crisp up the bottom. Great roasted wheat flavor, wonderful rise, satisfying chew but not tough at all. Using a top stone to cook the pizza and the bottom stone at the end just to crisp up the bottom works great! Also, the New York New Jersey Tomato Sauce was a real winner!

Quick question - have any of you tried Master Dough with Poolish and Master Dough with Tiga? I'm wondering what the difference is in terms of flavor and texture. Poolish seems so much easier to make and contributes to elasticity, while Biga/Tiga is supposed to add strength, so I'm wondering why you'd want to add a strength building preferment to a High Gluten flour, unless it adds a much better flavor? It seems to be counterproductive to building a tender pizza. Is there really any benefit?

Thanks!

Alex

I have not used Tiga, but I have been using the last dough ball of my batch as the poolish for the next batch. I LOVE the flavor. Better taste than most of the doughs that I come across on a regular basis.

Offline rrpizza

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  • Posts: 47
  • Location: asdasd
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: The Pizza Bible
« Reply #262 on: February 23, 2017, 12:35:45 PM »
Just picked up the kindle version of the book only 1.99, worth the risk and so far seems like an interesting read.

Offline mgk65

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  • Posts: 8
Re: The Pizza Bible
« Reply #263 on: March 06, 2017, 12:59:44 PM »
The Pizza Bible on sale at Amazon

Kindle edition is $2.

Sorry if this is the wrong place.

mgk

Offline SliceofFelicia

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  • Posts: 2
  • Location: Bermuda
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: The Pizza Bible
« Reply #264 on: Yesterday at 08:20:27 PM »
Hi All, As I am a newbie to PM,  I didn't feel it was necessary to start my own topic, but I wanted to comment on my first experience with the pizza bible. Yes, it's been around for 3 years since he came out with his book, yes I've owned it for probably 2 years, but I finally tried it myself... ish. I bake in my home oven, typically with a stone on top and baking steel on the bottom. Oven goes up to 550 thank goodness.

As background, My hand-kneaded recipe for the past ~2-3 years has been the following 63% hydration:
500 grams flour (Robin Hood bread flour)
315 grams water- never cared about temperature
10 grams roland fine sea salt (blue top)
4 grams active dry yeast
1. Hand mix, flour & dry ingredients first, then water and knead together 2. Let rise for 20 minutes covered in plastic, 3. knead and portion to 4 dough balls (small personal size), 4. Rise 2 nights 5. bake after 48 hour rise... we liked that amount.

This worked well and we enjoyed, but then I purchased a kitchenaid mixer and wanted some guidance on proper pizza prep.

I went to Tony's intro/master recipe as the foundationbut because I didn't have diastatic malt or proper flours (Bermuda issues), I used his METHOD, but kept my ingredients/portions. The only thing i added was the 5 grams olive oil ... yum. I did follow his sequence, which as many of you know, involves temping the water, dissolving yeast before mixing, bulk fermenting overnight, and then only making 2 dough balls rather than 4. I didn't wait 24 hours before assembling the pies, but probably around 19 hours

I admit these were a lot of changes for me, but it was fun to align to a recipe like Tony's, and I know I have a lot of work moving forward.

Key Takeaways:
1. Welcome new mixer and black residue on my dough beacuse of the new stainless steel! Googled it and all ok, although I tossed the first batch out of fear.
2. Loved Tony's recs for the hand-knead/forming of the initial dough ball post-mixer... This was quite satisfying and I was pleased with the texture of my dough and ability to follow directions.
3. 24 hours later: Not sure if my dough was too sticky as there was residue on my hands after the initial bulk ferment... should I have added more flour before the bulk ferment? I added not more than 1/8 cup throughout the initial kneading.
3. Cooked the pies at my friend's house... brought over my baking steel, dough scraper, semolina/flour mix, etc, and their oven only goes to 500 F but I was excited to try out the recipe. Hardest part was taking the dough out of the dough tray... as mentioned and echoing the sentiments from Tony.
4. I probably should have let the crust brown more on the bottom (FYI had no diastatic malt), but I turned the pie halfway through and also broiled at the end. 8-10 minutes cook time, not too worried about this part as it is easy to perfect along the way.
5. I had too much flour/semolina mix on the peel/bottom of the dough that the excess definitely fried up in the oven... need to be more confident about the staying-power of the dough rather than compensating with too much flour.
6. MUCH fluffier crust than I usually do(ugh), but the cornicone was nice (burnt a bit but not a bad taste) and there was a stable enough undercarriage...

Overall my taste testers enjoyed the two pies, and I'm ready to perfect the hydration of my dough... need more advice on #3, and will be able to work on the rest most likely!

Toppings for pie #1: tomato sauce, roasted eggplant, pepperoni, fresh mozz (moisture squeezed out).
Pie #2: Tom Sauce/Pesto Mix, Prosciutto, Roasted red pepers, fresh mozz (moisture squeezed out), topped with fresh arugula, oil, sliced parm

<follow at @SliceofFelicia on instagram where I try to document my pizza adventures>

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